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OLD PULTENEY   12 years old 40 %    INFO       
PulteneyDistillery Co.

OLD PULTENEY   15 years old 60,6 %          
Cask Strenght
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Bottling
Cask No. 0000930
Pulteney Distillery Co.

OLD PULTENEY   15 years old 60,8 %
LAST  BOTTLE  AND  EMPTY
          
Cask Strenght
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
Sherry Wood
Sherry Cask No. 1525
Distilled 9 December 1983
Bottled March 1998
Pulteney Distiller Co.

OLD PULTENEY   18 years old 59,5%                  
Cask Strenght
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask
Sherry Wood
Limited Edition
Sherry Cask No. 1499
Distilled 9 December  1982
Bottled August 2001
Pulteney Distillery Co.

OLD PULTENEY   26 years old 46 %   INFO        
HIGHLAND SELECTION
Bourbon Cask
Limited Edition
Distilled 1974
Bottled 2001
1600 bottles
Pulteney Distillery, Wick.

OLD PULTENEY   8 years old 40%             
RARE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
Proprietors: J. & G. Stodart
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

OLD PULTENEY   8 years old 57%            
RARE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
Proprietors: J. & G. Stodart
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

OLD PULTENEY   15 years old 40 %            
RARE SINGLE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
The Northernmost Distillery on the Mainland
Trademark of Proprietors:
J. & G. Stodart Ltd, Wick, Caithness
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

OLD PULTENEY   Distilled 1961 40%           
RARE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
Proprietors: J. & G. Stodart
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

OLD PULTENEY   33 years old 40%      
RARE SINGLE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
The Northernmost Distillery on the Mainland
Distilled 1964
Bottled 1997
Trademark of Proprietors:
The Pulteney Distillery Co, Ltd.
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

OLD PULTENEY   31 years old 46%            
RARE SINGLE HIGHLAND MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY
The Northernmost Distillery on the Mainland
Distilled 1968
Bottled 1999
Single Cask No. 3248
Proprietors: The Pulteney Distillery Co.,
Ltd Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

PULTENEY   12 years old 43 %            
THE ULTIMATE SINGLE MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY SELECTION
Distilled 26/4/90
Bottled 6/11/2002
Cask no. 25005
Matured in a Bourbon Barrel
Genummerde flessen
The Ultimate Whisky Company, N.L.

OLD PULTENEY   26 years old 58,3 %           
PEERLESS
CASK STRENGTH RARE AULD
SCOTCH WHISKY
A Unique Whisky of Distinction
Fons et Origo
Distilled 1977
Bottled 2004
Cask No 3078
209 numbered bottles

OLD PULTENEY  15 years old  46 %          
Distilled 1986
Bottled September 2001
Non Chill - Filtered
Limited Edition
Pulteney Distillery Co.

OLD PULTENEY  20 years old  57,5%                   
Distilled 1983
Bottled Februari 2003
Cask No. 6181
Single Cask Bottling
Limited Edition
Pulteney Distillery Co.

PULTENEY    15 years old 43 %                 
THE ULTIMATE SINGLE MALT
SCOTCH WHISKY SELECTION
Distilled 27/10/89
Bottled 29/3/05
Matured in a Bourbon Barrel
Cask no. 12172
Numbered Bottles
The Ultimate Whisky Company, N.L

OLD PULTENEY   21  years old 46 %  INFO          
1983 - 2004
NINETEEN EIGHTY THREE
THE GENUINE MARITIME MALT
Limited Edition
Special Edition
No Chill Filtration
No Colouring
Pulteney Distillery, Wick

PULTENEY   16 years old 46 %               
THE ULTIMATE SINGLE MALT   
SCOTCH WHISKY SELECTION
Single Highland
Malt Distilled:   27/10/89
Matured  in a Bourbon barrel
Cask no:   12179
Bottled:   13/02/06
Numbered Bottles
Natural Colour
Non Chillfiltered
The Ultimate Whisky Company, N.L.

OLD   PULTENEY       Aged  17 years 46 %           
THE GENUINE MARITIME MALT
Special Edition Cask Bottling
Non Chill-Filtered
Pulteney Distillery Co,  Wick

PULTENEY   Aged 28 Years 58,6 %          
RARE AULD SC0TCH WHISKY
CASK STRENGHT
Unique Whiskies of Distinction
´Fons et Origo´
D T C
date distilled 07.1977
date bottled 11.2005
cask no. 3077
204 Numbered Bottles
No Chill Filtering or Colouring
of any kind
Duncan Taylor & Co, Ltd,
Huntly, Aberdeenshire

OLD PULTENEY    Aged 15 Years  54,9 %                          
1991
NINETEEN  NINETY  ONE
CASK  STRENGHT
THE  GENUINE  MARITIME  MALT
Numbered Bottles
Old Pulteney Distillery Co, Wick

OLD  PULTENEY   Aged 30 years 44 %  INFO
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Distilled, Matured & Bottled in Scotland
Neither coloured nor chill - filtered
by Pulteney Distillery Co, Wick

PULTENEY   VINTAGE   1 9 9 8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

14  years old  46 %                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

SPIRIT  OF  SCOTLAND                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Distilled: 26/08/1998                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Selected by Van Wees September 2012                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Cask Type: 1st Fill Bourbon BarreL                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Cask No: 1060                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Bottled: 21/09/201                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Specially Selected Produced and Bottled by                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

Speymalt Whisky Ditrubutors Limited, Elgin

OLD  PULTENEY    INFO             
ISABELLA  FORTUNA    46 %                       
W K   4 9 9
2ND  RELEASE
Exclusive to Travail Retail
Unchill - filtered
Natural Colour
Pulteney Distillery, Wick
                                                                   
OLD  PULTENEY   46 % INFO                       
G O O D   H O P E
W K  2 0 9
LIMITED  EDITION
EXCLUSIVE  TO  TRAVEL  RETAIL
Natural Colour
Unchill - Filtered
Old Pulteney Distillery Co, Wick
                                                              
OLD  PULTENEY  46 % INFO                     
THE  MARITIME  MALT
S P E C T R U M
W K  2 1 7
LIMITED  EDITION
EXCLUSIVE  TO  TRAVEL  RETAIL
Natural Colour
Unchil - Filtered
Old Pulteney Distillery, Wick

OLD  PULTENEY INFO
Aged  16 years  54.6 %                                            
SINGLE  MALT  SCOTCH  WHISKY
FROM  A  SINGLE  CASK
Date Distilled: 21st Nov 1997
Society Single Cask: Code 52.19
Cask Type: Refill Hogshead / ex Bourbon
Outturn: One of Only 269 Bottles
The Scotch Malt Whisky Society,
The Vaults, Leith, Edinburgh
Flapping sails and ship's timbers

PULTENEY
VINTAGE  2 0 0 8
6  years old 46 %                            
THE  ULTIMATE  SINGLE  MALT
SCOTCH  WHISKY
Highland Single Malt
Distilled: 27/05/08
Matured in a Bourbon Barrel
Cask no: 800001
Bottled: 06/05/15
Natural Colour
Non Chill Filtered
Selected by The Ultimate Whisky Company.NL


PULTENEY

2 0 0 8
Highland Single Malt
The Ultimate Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Distilled: 27/05/08
Matured in a Bourbon Barrel
Cask no: 800014
Bottled: 02/05/18
328 Bottles
Bottle no: 59
Natural Colour
Non Chillfiltered
The Ultimate Whisky Company. NL


Highland Malt
The Northern Highlands
OLD PULTENEY (1826)

Wick, Caithness. Licentiehouder: The Pulteney Distillery Company Ltd. Het eigendom van Inver House.
Gesticht door James Henderson in 1826, is Pulteney de meest noordelijk gelegen distilleerderij op het vaste land van Schotland.
Sir William J. Pulteney, directeur van de Britse Visserij vereniging is naamgever van de stad.
Wick was in die tijd een heel belangrijke vissershaven.
James Henderson had aanvankelijk een distilleerderij iets meer landinwaarts, maar verhuisde die naar een plek, meer aan de kust gelegen.
De familie Henderson bleef tot 1923 eigenaar van Pulteney, maar ze zagen zich ge-dwongen de distilleerderij te verkopen als gevolg van de crisis jaren na de eerste wereldoorlog.
James Watson & Co, Ltd, ook de eigenaar van Parkmore en Ord werd de nieuwe eigenaar.
James Watson & Co, Ltd werd een paar jaar later overgenomen door John Dewar & Sons, die vervolgens fuseerden met John Walker en in 1925 samen gingen met de Distillers Company Ltd. (D.C.L). en Pulteney werd gesloten.
Pulteney bleef gesloten tot 1951 toen R. Cumming, een notaris afkomstig van Banff en al de eigenaar van Blablair sinds 1947, de distilleerderij kocht.
Robert Cumming verbouwde de distilleerderij, maar vond geen afzet genoeg voor zijn whisky en verkocht de beide distilleerderijen aan Hiram Walker, nu Allied Domecq.
Allied Domecq ging door met het verbouwen en verbeteren van Pulteney, de ketels (twee) werden vervangen door één grotere en de moutvloeren werden buiten gebruik gesteld.
In 1995 koopt Inver House zowel Balblair als Pulteney.
Old Pulteney heeft als bijnaam de Manzanilla of the North. Het is een heel snel rijpende whisky.
Het koelwater komt van Hempriggs Loch, het proceswater is leidingwater. Old Pulteney kan ongeveer 900.000 liter spirit per jaar produceren. De Mash tun is 38.440 liter. De zes Wash backs zijn elk 23.200 liter.
De Wash still is 16.100 liter en de Spirit still 13.200 liter en ze worden met stoom verhit.
De distilleerderij kat van Pulteney heet Kipper.
William Johnstone Pulteney ( 1729 - 1805 )
Both the whisky and the town are named after Sit William Pulteney, a prominent figure and influential M.P. and once Governor of the British Fisheries Society which had commissioned Thomas Telford to lay out the new township in 1803.
In 1790 William Johnstone Pulteney also endowed the first Chair of Agriculture in Britain at Edinburgh University and nominated Dr. Andrew Coventry to be the first Professor. ( 1790 - 1830 ).

Pulteney's Sensational Still:
Aside from its unique taste, Pulteney has another claim to fam - the unusual shap of one of its stills.
There are two stills at Pulteney, one for each of the distillations needed.
The wash still, which was originally purchased from McTaggert of Campbeltown was slightly too large for Pulteney distillery.
The manager of the distillery, wa that time, felt there was only one way to resolve this problem, cut th still top off!
Although one can never strictly indentify all the factors which lead to a malt's style, such are the number of variables, iy is highly problable that the slightly unusual shape of this wash still contributes to the depth of character present in this single malt.

1824   James Henderson sticht de distilleerderij en geeft de distilleerderij
  de naam Pulteney, naar Sir William Johnstone Pulteney, directeur van de
  Britse Visserij Vereniging
1920   James Watson is de nieuwe eigenaar
1923   Buchanan - Dewar neemt James Watson & Co over en wordt eigenaar van Pul-
  teney
1925   Buchanan - Dewar gaat deel uitmaken van The Distillers Company Limited
  (D.C.L.)
1930   De produktie stopt
1951   Pulteney wordt weer opgestart, na te zijn overgenomen door Robert Cumming
  een advokaat die ook Balblair koopt
1955   Robert Cumming verkoopt de distilleerderijen aan James & George Stodart Ltd,
  het eigendom van Hiram Walker & Sons
1958   Pulteney wordt herbouwd
1959   De mouterij wordt gesloten
1961   Allied Breweries neemt J. & G. Stodart over
1981   Allied Breweries verandert zijn naam in Allied Lyons na de overname van J.
  Lyons in 1978
1994   Allied Lyons neemt Pedro Domecq over en verandert zijn naam opnieuw: Allied
  Domecq Plc
1995   Allied Domecq verkoopt Pulteney aan Inverhouse Distillers
2001   Pacific Spirits of wel Great Oriole Group, neemt Inverhouse over voor £ 85
  miljoen
2005   Kapaciteit: 1.000.000 liter spirit per jaar.

2006       Inverhouse changes owners when International Beverage Holdings acquieres
              Pacific Spirits U.K.

Highland Malt The Northern Highlands (OLD) PULTENEY Inver House
Ontstaan door een management - buy - out, onder leiding van Bill Robertson en Angus Graham, die € 8,2 miljoen investeerden.
November 2001 werd Inver House voor E 56 miljoen gekocht door Pacific Spirits, onderdeel van de op de Virgin Islands gevestigde Great Oriole Group van de Thaise zakenman Charoen Sirivadhanabakdi.
Manager van Pacific Spirits is Ooi Boon Aun.
Robertson en Graham ontvangen samen € 37 miljoen en ook de 130 medewerkers ontvangen geld, sommigen € 50.000.
Inbegrepen in de koop zijn de vijf distilleerderijen Knockdhu, Speyburn, (Old) Pulteney Balblair en Balmenach.

Established in 1826 in the town of Wick, Pulteney Distillery is the most northerly distillery on the mainland and at that time was only accessible by sea. The barley was brought in by sea, the Whisky shipped out by boat and many of the distillery workers were also employed as fishermen. Sadly the fishing industry is no longer part of daily life in Wick but Pulteney Distillery continues to operate using the same traditional distilling methods first introduced in the 1800's to create one of the finest Highland Malts available.
Pulteney is one of the most unique Scotch whisky distilleries. The wash still has no swan neck and it is thought that when the original still was delivered, it was to tall for the stillhouse and the manager insisted it was 'cut off. The spirit still resembles a 'Smuggler's kettle' and both undoubtedly contribute to the distinctive character of the whisky.
Once distilled, the spirit is filled into a selection of specially selected bourbon and sherry casks and laid to rest in the distillery warehouses, until the distillery manager decides the optimum time for bottling each od the casks.
Throughout the years of maturation, the casks have taken time to absorb the Northen Scottish sea breeze and as a result, Old Pulteney Single Malt Scotch Whisky is often referred to as 'The Manzanilla of the North'.

Our Maritime History

One of the oldest distilleries in Scotland, the Pulteney Distillery was founded in 1826 in Wick
by James Henderson, during the town's 'herring boom'. At the time, the town was only accessible by sea; barley was shipped into Wick and the whisky shipped out. Many of the original distillery
workers were also herring fishermen

The herring industrie was vital to Wick, which became the busiest fishing port in Europe, with the
fleet reaching its peak of more than 1000 boats in the 1850s and 1860s

At this time it was said that you could walk across the harbour from one pier to another without
getting your feet wet

With  over 7000 workers arriving in the town each herring season, Wick became a wild, lawless
place where rioting was common. With the Reverend Thomson claiming that more than 500 gallons of whisky were being drunk in the town each day, and troops and gunboats being called
in to keep the peace, the authorities imposed prohibition. Although prohibition was not lifted
until 1947, the Pulteney Distillery continued to produce whisky in the town, even though it was
by law, dry. In 1997, 50 years to the day after the repeal of prohibition, Old Pulteney 12 Year Old
Highland Single Malt Whisky was launched

A Unique Distillery

The most northerly distillery on the British mainland, Pulteney Distillery is one of the few distilleries to be named after a person; Sir William Johnstone Pulteney, who gave his name to
Pulteneytown in Wick. Pulteneytown was built (along with the harbour and bridge) by the world -
famous engineer Thomas Telford using money confiscated from the Jacobite chiefs after Bonnie
Prince Charlie's failed revolution.

Pulteney Distillery is itself one of the most unusual malt distilleries, with the wash still having
no 'swan neck'. It is thought that when the still was delivered it was too tall for the stillhouse
and the manager simply cut the top (of the still) off. This, combined with the distillery's
windswept location and the use of traditional 'worm tubs' to condense the spirit, is credited
with contributing to a malt that has been described as "unashamedly excellent" by leading
whisky writer Jim Murray

All Old Pulteney is bottled in a unique bottle, the shape of which mirrors that of the still at
Pulteney Distillery. Aged for 30 years, this expression features single malt whisky matured in
ex - bourbon (American oak) wood. It is neither coloured nor chill - filtered   

Established in 1826 in the town of Wick, the Pulteney Distillery is the most northerly
on the and at that time was only accessible by sea. The barley was brought in by sea
the whisky shipped out by boat and many of the distillery workers were also employed
as fishermen.

During the 19th century, Wick became the capital of the "Herring Boom"which saw the                                                                                                                                                                                                    

town transformed from a remote Highland village into "the greatest fishing station
In the world" with more than 1000 drifters harboured there. The fishing industry was
dominated by the "Herring Drifter"fishing boats, originally sail boats, with the first
recorded steam drifter built in Wick in 1869. All boats from Wick are indentified by the
letters "W K " in their registration. At the peak of the "Herring Boom" steam drifter numbered more than 1,800 of which only two seaworthy examples remain intact today.
Place.


The fishing industry is no longer part of daily life in Wick but Pulteney Distillery in the heart
the the town, continues to operate using the same traditional distilling methods first
introduced in the 1800's to create a astonishingly complex single malt, with a rich mineral -
salted spiciness that is the very essence of this remarkable place.

ISABELLA  FORTUNA  W K  4 9 9

Originally called Isabella and launched in 1890 powerd by two big lug sails she plied the
waters of the north east for 86 years. In 1919 she was fitted with a 15 hp Kelvin engine
which was upgraded in 1928 and then again in 1932. All this time her name changed to
Fortuna. In 1976 she was purchased and restored and became the Isabella Fortuna  
incorporating both original names. She was acquired in 1997 by the Wick Society where
she remains to this day, the last drifter in Wick harbour.


6th February 2013

The Spirit Safe is replaced , built by Blairs of Glasgow, but not brand new, is was originally
at the Glenflagler distillery in Airdrie which closed in 1985.

The Spirit Safe had only been used for 19 years.

In addition th this the cooper on the stills has been newly - lacquered and also a new mash
tun is installed.

GOOD  HOPE  W K 209

Built in Wick in 1948 and powered by a
Gardner 152hp engine she was 55 feet
In length and weighed in at 24 tons.
The Good Hope was the first boat in
Wick to install an echo sounder, using
radio  navigation to find the ever elusive
shoals of herring.

SPECTUM
W K 2 1 7
Built in 1920 and made famous as one of the first
Wick drifters to use a pioneering type of fishing
called Anchor Seine Netting. She was also used
in the 1939 - 45 war for harbour service duties.

OLD  PULTENEY

1 September 2013-09-06

The Lighthouse Collection:

This Collection features 3 different additions: Noss Head, Duncansby Head, Pentland
Skerries, each bears the name of a lighthouse close to the Pulteney Distillery.

Pulteney an Old Pulteney yacht is one of the ships of the Clipper 2013 -2014 Round
the World Yacht Race, skippered by Dutchman Patrick van der Zijden.

Pulteney’s wash still has a massive boil bulb almost as large as the base of the still and a flat top. This helps to produce high levels of reflux and separate specific alcohols. The spirit still has both a purifier pipe and a very convoluted, coiling lyne arm. Again, reflux is maximised here, with that purifier conceivably adding oiliness to the character. Condensing takes place in worm tubs which add weight.


Old Pulteney (as the brand is named) demonstrates this balance between the heavy, leathery and oily, with a fragrant almost ozonic freshness.

From the late 18th century until the start of WWI, the northern port of Wick was the capital of the herring trade. Its huge harbour was built in 1808 and a decade later 822 boats were operating out of the port. By 1860 that number had risen to over 1,000.

This explosion in trade in turn necessitated housing and in 1810 Thomas Telford built a new town on the south bank of the river which he named Pulteneytown after Sir William Pulteney MP, who as head of the Fisheries Board was instrumental in Wick’s expansion.

This rapid increase in population then, inevitably, cried out for a distillery and in 1825, James Henderson, who had been distilling out of sight of the law in Stemster, moved into Pulteneytown and started making whisky.

The Henderson family retained ownership for almost a century before selling in 1920 to Jas. Watson of Dundee. Two years later under the influence of an American evangelist, the Wick town council voted to make the town a ‘dry’ one with no sales of alcohol permitted. Whether this had any influence on Graham is unclear, but in 1924 Old Pulteney had been passed on to John Dewar & Sons and from there was brought within DCL. The distillery remained in production until 1930 when a downturn in the market forced it to close.

Its doors re-opened in 1951 – four years after Wick’s ‘Prohibition’ ended – when local businessman Robert ‘Bertie’ Cumming bought it. He sold it and his other distillery, Balblair, to Canadian giant Hiram Walker in 1955 and from there through a series of mergers it ended up in the Allied Distillers’ stable. When Allied sold it and Balblair to Inver House in 1995 it was in dire need of repair.

Since then, the distillery has been renovated, a visitors' centre has opened and the Old Pulteney brand has been successfully established.  

1826
James Henderson founds Pulteney Distillery
1920
After a century in family ownership, the distillery is sold to James Watson
1924
The distillery passes to John Dewar & Sons
1930
Pulteney ceases distillation after a downturn in the market
1951
Local solicitor Robert Cumming buys the distillery and resumes production
1955
Cumming sells Pulteney, along with Balblair, to Hiram Walker, which renovates part of the distillery
1995
Now part of the Allied Domecq stable after a series of mergers, Pulteney is sold to Inver House Distillers
2001
Pacific Spirits, a subsidiary of British Virgin Islands-based beverage group Great Oriole, purchases Inver House for £56m
2006
International Beverage Holdings acquires Pacific Spirits UK
PULTENEY FACTS

CAPACITY (MLPA) i
1.8
CONDENSER TYPE i
Worm tubs
FERMENTATION TIME i
52 hours
FILLING STRENGTH i
69%
GRIST WEIGHT (T) i
5
HEAT SOURCE i
Steam and biomass
MALT SPECIFICATION i
Unpeated
MALT SUPPLIER i
Mostly Bairds
MASH TUN MATERIAL i
Stainless steel
MASH TUN TYPE i
Semi-lauter
NEW-MAKE PHENOL LEVEL i
<1ppm
NEW-MAKE STRENGTH i
69%
SPIRIT STILL CHARGE (L) i
13,500
SPIRIT STILL SHAPE i
Small squat with purifier (purifer not used)
SPIRIT STILL SIZE (L) i
17,343
STILLS i
2
WAREHOUSING i
2 racked warehouses and 3 dunnage
WASH STILL CHARGE (L) i
15,000
WASH STILL SHAPE i
Small, squat, large boil bubble, cut off top
WASH STILL SIZE (L) i
21,707
WASHBACK CHARGE (L) i
35,000
WASHBACK TYPE i
5 corten steel, 1 stainless steel
WASHBACKS i
6
WATER SOURCE i
Loch Hempriggs via The Lade
YEAST TYPE i
Dried distillers M strain
OWNERS

International Beverage Holdings
2006 - present
CURRENT OWNER

Inver House Distillers
1995 - present
PREVIOUS OWNERS

Allied Lyons
1981 - 1995
Allied Breweries
1961 - 1981
Hiram Walker & Sons
1958 - 1961
Robert Cumming
1951 - 1958
Distiller Company Limited
1925 - 1951
John Dewar & Sons
1924 - 1925
James Watson & Co
1920 - 1924
James Henderson
1826 - 1920

VINTAGE LAUNCHED
28 September 2017
Old Pulteney single malt is introducing two new whiskies to its range – a 25-year-old expression and a 1983 vintage malt – following the withdrawal of its 17-year-old and 21-year-old bottlings.

Old Pulteney 25-year-old 1983
New entrants: The launches follow the withdrawal of the 17- and 21-year-old expressions
The Highland distillery, based at Wick in the far north of Scotland, matured the new 25-year-old expression in ex-Bourbon American oak barrels for 22 years, followed by three years in ex-oloroso Spanish oak butts.

Bottled at 46% abv, Old Pulteney 25 Year Old is described as having ‘mature and fragrant flavour notes’, with ‘heavy spices and dark chocolate… rum-soaked raisins and lime honey, punctuated with clean notes of orange peel and baked apples’.

It will be available globally from early October 2017 at independent and specialist retailers, with a UK RRP of £300.

‘We’re extremely proud to launch this premium addition to our core range,’ said Karen Walker, marketing director at International Beverage, owner of Old Pulteney parent company Inver House Distillers.

‘As one of the finest single malt whiskies in the world, it embodies Wick’s spirit of endurance and the Pulteney distillery’s signature coastal style.’

Old Pulteney 1983 Vintage was matured in ex-Bourbon American oak barrels, before an extra spell in ex-oloroso Spanish oak butts, with ‘a chocolatey aroma with undertones of stewed fruit and toffee’.

Neither chill-filtered nor coloured, it was bottled at 46% abv and will be available from specialist and independent retailers globally from October 2017, with a UK RRP of £500.

Walker described the new 1983 vintage expression as ‘eagerly anticipated and well worth the wait’.

The dual launches come after Inver House announced in June this year that Old Pulteney’s 17-year-old and 21-year-old expressions would be discontinued due to lack of stock.

While supplies of the 17-year-old are expected to last into 2018, the last bottles of 21-year-old have already entered the supply chain.

The news prompted speculation that the distillery would replace the expressions with NAS (no age statement) whiskies – a suggestion firmly denied by the company.
For many years Old Pulteney was only available from independent bottlers such as Gordon & MacPhail, but under the ownership of Inver House, distillery bottlings have proliferated, with the best-selling 12-year-old expression achieving strong sales in many international markets.

In addition to the 12-year-old, other core variants of Old Pulteney include 12, 17, 21 and 35-year-old expressions, along with the NAS Voyager. Stylistically, Old Pulteney is sweet, fruity and malty, with an edge of salt.

The distillery is equipped with a single pair of highly individual stills, with condensing taking place in a pair of stainless steel worm tubs. Both stills boast large boil balls, and the wash still has a unique, truncated, flat-topped appearance.


OLD PULTENEY HISTORY

Pulteney distillery was established in 1826 in the newly-developed Pulteneytown area of Wick by James Henderson, who had previously distilled at Stemster, near Halkirk, some 15 miles away. After almost a century of operation, Pulteney was acquired by the Dundee blending firm of James Watson & Co in 1920.

Five years later, Watson’s was absorbed into the Distillers Company, having previously been purchased by John Dewar & Sons. In 1930 production ceased at Pulteney, due to the imposition of prohibition in Wick in an attempt to curb drunkenness. The town remained ‘dry’ until 1947, and four years later Pulteney distillery re-opened, now in the hands of lawyer Bertie Cumming, who also owned Balblair.

In 1955 Cumming sold Pulteney on to the Canadian distilling giant Hiram Walker & Sons, through its James & George Stodart subsidiary. The distillery was substantially rebuilt during 1958/59, at which point floor maltings were abandoned. The plant was then acquired in 1961 by Allied Breweries – later Allied Domecq – who operated it until its sale to Inver House Distillers in 1995.

During the Allied regime, Old Pulteney, as the ‘make’ of the distillery had long been known, was destined almost exclusively for the blending vats – with Gordon & MacPhail bottling small quantities as an 8-year-old single malt – but Inver House set out to build a successful single malt brand.

As well as developing a range of aged expressions, In 2010 Pulteney introduced into the travel retail arena an expression with no-age-statement called WK499 Isabella Fortuna. This took its name from one of the last surviving herring drifters, built in 1890 and now preserved by the Wick Society. This was followed in 2012 by WK209, matured in European Sherry casks and named after another herring drifter, WK209 Good Hope, built in Wick during 1948, and by WK217 Spectrum which commemorated the steel-hulled steam drifter Spectrum, launched in 1920.

These bottlings further reinforced Pulteney’s role as the ‘Genuine Maritime Malt,’ as did their travel retail successors, a trio of expressions named after local lighthouses – Noss Head, Duncansby Head and Pentland Skerries.

Approximately 60% of the output of Pulteney distillery is retained by Inver House – now owned by Thai Beverage – for single malt bottling, and of that 60% some 95% is filled into ex-Bourbon casks for maturation in Pulteney’s five on-site warehouses


HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY

For many years Old Pulteney was only available from independent bottlers such as Gordon & MacPhail, but under the ownership of Inver House, distillery bottlings have proliferated, with the best-selling 12-year-old expression achieving strong sales in many international markets.

In addition to the 12-year-old, other core variants of Old Pulteney include 12, 17, 21 and 35-year-old expressions, along with the NAS Voyager. Stylistically, Old Pulteney is sweet, fruity and malty, with an edge of salt.

The distillery is equipped with a single pair of highly individual stills, with condensing taking place in a pair of stainless steel worm tubs. Both stills boast large boil balls, and the wash still has a unique, truncated, flat-topped appearance.


Pulteney distillery was established in 1826 in the newly-developed Pulteneytown area of Wick by James Henderson, who had previously distilled at Stemster, near Halkirk, some 15 miles away. After almost a century of operation, Pulteney was acquired by the Dundee blending firm of James Watson & Co in 1920.

Five years later, Watson’s was absorbed into the Distillers Company, having previously been purchased by John Dewar & Sons. In 1930 production ceased at Pulteney, due to the imposition of prohibition in Wick in an attempt to curb drunkenness. The town remained ‘dry’ until 1947, and four years later Pulteney distillery re-opened, now in the hands of lawyer Bertie Cumming, who also owned Balblair.

In 1955 Cumming sold Pulteney on to the Canadian distilling giant Hiram Walker & Sons, through its James & George Stodart subsidiary. The distillery was substantially rebuilt during 1958/59, at which point floor maltings were abandoned. The plant was then acquired in 1961 by Allied Breweries – later Allied Domecq – who operated it until its sale to Inver House Distillers in 1995.

During the Allied regime, Old Pulteney, as the ‘make’ of the distillery had long been known, was destined almost exclusively for the blending vats – with Gordon & MacPhail bottling small quantities as an 8-year-old single malt – but Inver House set out to build a successful single malt brand.

As well as developing a range of aged expressions, In 2010 Pulteney introduced into the travel retail arena an expression with no-age-statement called WK499 Isabella Fortuna. This took its name from one of the last surviving herring drifters, built in 1890 and now preserved by the Wick Society. This was followed in 2012 by WK209, matured in European Sherry casks and named after another herring drifter, WK209 Good Hope, built in Wick during 1948, and by WK217 Spectrum which commemorated the steel-hulled steam drifter Spectrum, launched in 1920.

These bottlings further reinforced Pulteney’s role as the ‘Genuine Maritime Malt,’ as did their travel retail successors, a trio of expressions named after local lighthouses – Noss Head, Duncansby Head and Pentland Skerries.

Approximately 60% of the output of Pulteney distillery is retained by Inver House – now owned by Thai Beverage – for single malt bottling, and of that 60% some 95% is filled into ex-Bourbon casks for maturation in Pulteney’s five on-site warehouses.


1826
Pulteney distillery is first licensed
1920
Pulteney is acquired by James Watson & Co
1924
John Dewar & Sons buys Watson’s
1925
Dewar’s becomes part of the Distillers Company Ltd.
1930
Pulteney distillery closes
1955
Cumming sells the distillery to Hiram Walker & Sons (Scotland)
1958/59
The distillery is substantially rebuilt
1961
Pulteney is sold to Allied Breweries, later Allied Domecq
1995
Allied Domecq sells Pulteney to Inver House Distillers
1997
Old Pulteney 12-year-old is introduced
2004
A 17-year-old Old Pulteney is added to the range
2005
Old Pulteney 21-year-old is introduced
2009
A 30-year-old expression is launched
2012
A 40-year-old Old Pulteney makes an appearance
2013
The ‘Lighthouse’ trio of expressions is launched in travel retail outlets, and Navigator is added to Old Pulteney’s core portfolio
2014
A 35-year-old appears as a replacement for the Old Pulteney 30-year-old
OWNERS

International Beverage Holdings logo
PARENT COMPANY

International Beverage Holdings
2006 - present
CURRENT OWNER

Inver House Distillers
1995 - present
PREVIOUS OWNERS

Allied Lyons
1981 - 1995
Allied Breweries
1970 - 1981


MALCOLM WARING, OLD PULTENEY
10 October 2017
Pulteney distillery manager Malcolm Waring may be a Geordie by birth, but the Highland town of Wick is very much his home. He talks to Richard Woodard about Old Pulteney’s unique spirit character and this remote area’s proud heritage.

Malcolm Waring Old Pulteney
Local pride: His roots lie elsewhere, but Wick is very much home for Malcolm Waring
‘I started off here on the shop floor: stillman, mashman, doing all aspects of it; looking after the warehouses, then I became brewer and then assistant manager. Then I went away and managed Knockdhu for six years.

‘It’s all about experience. You can learn a lot in your own place, but when you go away and learn how other places work, that’s what it’s all about.

‘At that time of my life with my family, Knockdhu was a great place to bring up kids. A nice place to live, nice people round about and a lovely distillery. You were still quite central.

‘I came back to Pulteney in 2006; it was good timing because, by then, the kids had finished their schooling.

‘What’s Pulteney like? It’s rainy, it’s windswept, it’s different. It’s been on its own for generations. It transfers across from the place and the town where it sits. The guys here are all local people, and the skills have been passed down from generation to generation. You become much stronger when you’re on your own – you’ve got to learn to adapt and survive.

‘We had Prohibition here in Wick from 1922 to 1947. In the US, I think it was only about 13 years? The Americans were just minnows in terms of Prohibition.

‘Pulteney is not conventional, it’s quirky. You wouldn’t build a distillery like that, with stills like that, any more, but it’s part of that character.

Pulteney stills

Quirky pots: Pulteney’s unconventional stills are the key to its idiosyncratic spirit character

‘The main thing for the new make spirit is obviously the still: it’s not very tall – it’s squat, it’s bulbous, with no swan neck. It’s producing a big, beefy, very powerful, salty, sulphury new make spirit. It’s oily. That’s what we’re looking for – we’re not looking for anything delicate here. Over the years you learn what casks will work with that.

‘In the range, we’ve kept on with the 12, but the 21 has gone away now, and we’ve brought in a 25-year-old and the 1983 vintage. It’s very limited, to be honest; we don’t have the availability of stock. The 25-year-old spends 22 years in ex-Bourbon, and then a further three years in Spanish oak.

‘I’m a Geordie by birth, my great-grandfather was Italian and my mother’s Welsh. But we moved here in the early ’70s, so Wick’s my home. I don’t know anywhere else because I was so young when we moved here.

‘Coming to Wick was a life-changing experience. In those days we were more isolated – I know it’s isolated now, but in those days it was even more removed. We didn’t have the influx of people as we do now.

‘In the past, most people would have been here for generations and generations. At one point in time, you knew just about everyone in the town.

‘Fishing was still quite big then. It was white fish by then though, not herring. There was still quite a big fishing fleet here then.

Pulteney distillery

Community spirit: Pulteney’s whisky is an expression of Wick and the surrounding area

‘In terms of demographics it’s changed a lot, and that’s a good thing. But we’ve lost some of the local characters. Everyone knew them, but now we haven’t got that so much.

‘We’ve got a really good Heritage Centre at Wick. You could spend days in there and never see it all. We had Thomas Telford, Robert Louis Stevenson – big names in their day. They spent a lot of time here doing various projects.

‘Now there are the wind farms. There’s a big amount of investment – up to £3bn in total. The first tranche is going ahead with something like 84 or 85 turbines. If the second tranche goes ahead, it’ll be 250 – one of the biggest offshore wind farms in Europe.

‘It will bring a lot of work to the town – something like 200 jobs – because a lot of the services will be located in Wick. Some of the old buildings are being renovated, but they’re being very sympathetic to the design of Thomas Telford. It’s being done right.

‘There was nothing here for many, many years [after the decline of fishing]. Now we have the pontoons in the marina bringing in people from all over. It’s breathing new life into the harbour, and in a new way.

Pulteney warehouse

Experience counts: Over time, Waring has learned which casks suit Pulteney’s spirit

‘At the height of the herring boom, they caught 32 million fish in two days. The generations are changing, but there’s a lot of initiatives in the town that keep those memories going.

‘We try to do everying using local trades. The barley isn’t grown in Wick, but it’s from the north of Scotland, and malted in Inverness and brought up. It’s all local people in terms of the workers we bring in.

‘The people of Wick very much identify with the distillery and they’re very proud of it. We want to bring that back to the town – it’s all about putting back into the community. The distillery is an integral part of Wick.

‘I grew up right next to the distillery, so I used to walk past it every day on my way to school. We used to block the glade [the distillery’s water source] with leaves and branches and so on – the way kids do.

‘I bought up one of the old houses on the right-hand side as you leave Wick harbour – not far from the castle. It looks out to sea – I got the keys about three weeks ago. That’s my retirement project – it’s a long-term project. We’re going to add an extension on the back and change things round a bit.

‘It is a bit of a windy spot, though, right enough. I’m not expecting to grow any trees in the garden.’


WICK, WHISKY AND THE HERRING BOOM

Silver and gold… The history of the remote Highland town of Wick is all about the ‘silver darlings’ – the shoals of herring that brought 19th-century prosperity – and whisky, the golden ‘nectar of Caithness’.

Pulteney distillery
Standing strong: Pulteney distillery has endured through most of Wick’s rollercoaster history (Photo: VisitScotland)
Whisky flows through the teeming pages of Wick’s rich history, from 17th-century battles through the Victorian herring boom and into the crusading efforts of the temperance movement in the 1920s.

In that time, ‘the nectar of Caithness’ has killed people and lured them to their ruin; it has provided a livelihood to many, and been source of relief to many more; and it has, in its darkest days, inspired a period of Prohibition twice as long as that endured in the US.

The shoals of herring – the ‘silver darlings’ that brought so much prosperity to this place – are a distant memory now, and the town hasn’t been ‘dry’ in 70 years. Still, the Pulteney distillery lives on as a physical reminder of Wick’s tribulations, surviving temporary closure and multiple owners to enjoy altogether better times in the early 21st century.

On first impressions, the town has a serious, even severe look about it, drawn up around the focal point of the harbour – which now boasts a modern marina populated by pleasure craft, and RIBs (rigid inflatable boats) offering tourist trips to explore the dramatic coastline and its teeming wildlife.

That’s some contrast to the picture 150 years ago, when there were so many fishing boats moored here that a person could reputedly walk from one side of the harbour to the other without getting their feet wet.

But we’re getting ahead of ourselves; whisky first. As in so many parts of Scotland, in this north-eastern corner of the country the national spirit recedes into the mists of history; but, as long ago as the 17th century, it was part of everyday life.

Pulteney distillery warehouse

Still standing: But Pulteney distillery was closed for more than 20 years from 1930 (Photo: VisitScotland)

In July 1680, a dispute over the earldom of Caithness between Lord Glenorchy and George Sinclair led to a violent battle near Wick – the last of its kind on Scottish soil, and one in which whisky played a decisive role.

The story goes that Sinclair’s troops were quartered in Wick on the eve of battle, thinking that its comforts would give them the edge the following morning. They reckoned without the scheming of Glenorchy, however. Historian Thomas Pennant reports:

‘Glenorchy thought proper to add stratagem to force. He knew that in those days whisky was the nectar of Caithness, and in consequence ordered a ship laden with that precious liquor to pass around, and wilfully strand itself on the shore. The Caithnessians made a prize of the vessel, and in indulging themselves too freely, became an easy prey to the Earl.’

The battle the following day was one-sided to say the least, with Sinclair’s hung-over troops driven into the river, many of them drowning.

Shortly after Pennant visited Wick in 1769, a new trade came to the town that was to utterly transform its fortunes for the next century and a half. Herring fishing began to take off from the late 1780s, but the intervention of the British Fisheries Society in the early 1800s led to the creation of Pulteneytown on the southern banks of the Wick river – and the foundation of what was then the world’s biggest herring port.

The scheme was the brainchild of Sir William Pulteney, a remarkable character who, when he died in 1805, was one of the wealthiest men in Europe, with a fortune equivalent to £5bn after judicious investments in the Americas (he is said to have owned half of Manhattan Island).

Governor of the British Fisheries Society, Pulteney commissioned protégé Thomas Telford to draw up plans for a new town and fishing port to fully exploit the nascent herring boom. Pulteney died before it could be completed, but the town (and, later, the distillery) was named in his honour.

Pulteney’s and Telford’s plans were ambitious, but they could scarcely have foreseen what was to come: by the 1830s, the volume of ships was such that an outer harbour had to be added – and that was just the beginning.

Wick harbour herring fleet

Boom town: More than 1,000 boats moored in Wick every year in the mid-19th century (Photo: The Johnston Collection/The Wick Society)

In 1862, more than 1,100 fishing vessels were based at Wick for the summer season; the population of the town, normally just a few thousand, multiplied by three or four times when the herring fleet was in.

Some lived on their boats, others in dormitories above the curing sheds, or in attics, cellars and outhouses. Outbreaks of cholera, typhoid and diphtheria were a frequent threat.

Robbed of home and livelihood by the Highland Clearances, many had trekked for 100 miles across wild country for a chance of work and pay. Most had little or no experience of fishing; accidents and fatalities were frequent as a result.

Not just men, either. The ‘herring lassies’ descended on Wick in their many hundreds, spending 12 weeks each summer gutting and packing the ‘silver darlings’ before following the herring south to Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft.

The peak was reached in 1867 when, it is said, 3,500 herring lassies gutted 50 million herring at Wick in just two days, packing them into barrels for export to England, to Scandinavia, to Russia and the US.

Some 650 coopers were resident in Wick at this time, coopering 125,000 barrels a year to cope with demand. When the local oak was exhausted, they used larch, birch and fir; when that too was gone, birch, ash and Scandinavian fir were imported from Norway.

This was thirsty work, as one James Henderson was swift to recognise. The records state that he had ‘attended to a small distillery owned by himself’ at the family farm in nearby Stemster from about 1819, but seven years later he abandoned this ‘unofficial’ enterprise to go legit in partnership with local businessman John Kirk. The licensed distillery – then making Henderson’s Whisky and later to become Pulteney – was soon very busy indeed.

Wick herring gutting

Herring lassies: Some 50 million of the ‘silver darlings’ were gutted in only 48 hours at Wick in 1867 (Photo: The Johnston Collection/The Wick Society)

During the 1840s, the town had no fewer than 41 licensed premises (20 in Wick, 21 in Pulteneytown) and, in 1844, it’s reckoned that more than 800 gallons of whisky – roughly 5,000 bottles – were being consumed every week. And this wasn’t mature, 40% abv whisky, but fiery new make at about 69% abv.

‘They used to fish every night, starting in the evening when the herring came up to the surface,’ says Malcolm Waring, Pulteney distillery manager. ‘They took stone flagons [of whisky] with them, and they drank.

‘They would sell their catch every day and get paid every day, get their money and go to the pub. There was heavy drinking.’

Despite all of this, Wick was also God-fearing, with the Sabbath strictly observed and prayer meetings heavily attended. There was a strong temperance movement – led, as you’d imagine, by the women who saw precious little of their husbands’ wages – and it is perhaps surprising that Prohibition took so long to come to the town.

When it did, in 1922, times were already radically different. The First World War had taken its toll on the young male population, and the conflict, combined with changing tastes and rampant overfishing, had all but killed the herring boom. ‘There were 18,000 casks of salted herring sitting on the docks when the First World War broke out,’ says Waring.

Fishing continued, moving on to white fish and cod; then, more recently, crab, lobster and scallops – but it never regained the heights of the Victorian age.

Counter-intuitively, Prohibition did not mean the end for the Pulteney distillery; after all, it was a big world beyond the borders of Wick and, even in the town itself, ‘wayfarers’ could still enjoy a drink (but only with a meal).

Pulteney’s stills ran on until 1930, through a few changes of ownership, until the Depression succeeded where Prohibition had failed. The distillery remained silent until 1951, four years after Prohibition in Wick was lifted.

Pulteney distillery workers

Whisky workers: Pulteney distillery was a busy place while the herring boom lasted (Photo: The Johnston Collection/The Wick Society)

It has been in operation ever since, again with several different owners, before passing to Inver House Distillers in 1995. And, though much has changed – most notably through refurbishment in the late 1950s and post-1995 – this quirkiest of distilleries retains a flavour of the past in its cramped conditions, Heath Robinson-esque layout and two of the weirdest stills you’ll ever come across. The spirit, to its credit, is similarly characterful and distinctive.

And now, beyond the distillery doors and downhill to the harbour, there’s a fresh scent of renewal in the air – and not just in the marina and the tourist-carrying RIBs.

Up to £3bn is being invested in offshore wind farms here: a first tranche of 80 or 90 turbines, then – if all goes to plan – another 250, which would create one of the biggest projects of its kind in Europe.

For Wick, this means jobs. About 200, in total, as most of the services for the farms will be located in the town. Some of the old buildings designed by Telford for the fishing trade are being restored, discovering a new life more than two centuries after they were built.

And so the sea is once more bringing a livelihood to the people of Wick. One that may lack the scale of the 19th-century herring boom, but which promises to be far more environmentally sympathetic.

From the harbour, up through the streets of Pulteneytown to the distillery, things are looking up again in this far-flung, but eternally fascinating, corner of Scotland.


Old Pulteney
Highlands Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Among single malt aficionados, particularly those who have a preference for the types of malts from the Northern Highlands distilleries, Old Pulteney holds an almost cult status.

Owned by
Inver House Distillers (International Beverage Holdings Limited – part of Thai Beverage)

(Litres of Pure Alcohol-LPA) 1,800,000 litres

Visitor Centre
Yes, tours are available all year round

Situated on the outskirts of the small, north Highland town of Wick (pop. c 7 000 inhabitants) just 18 miles (30km) south of John O’Groats, Old Pulteney is the most northerly distillery on the UK mainland. Furthermore, it is famed for being the only distillery to be named after a person: Sir William Johnstone Pulteney.

Sir William was the biggest name in the British fishing industry in the early years of the nineteenth century and rose to attain the tile of ‘Director of The British Fishing Society’.

In the early years of the 19th century he commissioned Britain’s leading civil engineer, Thomas Telford, to design and supervise the creation of a major new herring fishing town and harbour at the estuary of the River Wick. Indeed, the main town of Wick used to reference Sir William’s name (for many decades it was called ‘Pulteneytown’, until in 1902, it merged with Wick Harbour on the opposite side of the river estuary and the merged town was officially renamed Wick.)

Old Pulteney’s history
Thanks to the fishing industry in the early 1800s, the town of Wick grew from literally from a handful of habitations. By 1840, Wick was the busiest herring port of Europe and over 1000 boats sailed in and out of its newly constructed harbour. Workers came to work there in the herring trade from all over Scotland and because of their thirsty work copious amounts of whisky were needed to quench the workers’ thirst. The number of small illegal stills located in the town struggled to cope with the demand and as a result, in 1826, one of the locals, James Henderson, decided to build a legal still. He named the distillery Pulteney, after Sir William Pulteney.

The Pulteney Distillery supplied the town with sufficient quantities of a salty whisky until the First World War, during which the Scottish herring industry collapsed. By the end of the 1920s, unemployment in Wick was high but the incidence of drunkenness in public was even higher. In a bid to curb this behaviour, the town council decided to ban the sale of alcohol (as did over 50 other councils in similar circumstances throughout Scotland). The ban in Wick remained in place until 1947 and consequently the distillery was forced to close in 1930.

Some twenty years later, Robert James ‘Bertie’ Cumming who owned the Balblair Distillery (located further south down the north eastern Highland coast near Tain) restarted distilling at Pulteney.

During the late 1950s the distillery was sold to Hiram Walker of Ballantine’s whisky who rebuilt the it and expanded whisky production. The whisky produced at Pulteney at this time contributed significantly to major blends such as Ballantine’s.

During the difficult whisky crash of the 1980s, in Scotland, Pulteney struggled on, while other remote distilleries were closed down. In 1997, the distillery was purchased by Inver House Distillers, who changed the name to Old Pulteney and saw potential for its whisky in the growing single malt market and chose to promote this, rather than fulfilling old blending contracts, launching a 12, 17 and 21 year old single malt as a core range. These decisions breathed new life into the ailing distillery and put it back on the whisky map.





By 2006, Old Pulteney had broken into the world top 20 for single malt sales and planned to grow sales even further. It is, together with Speyburn, the best-selling of Inver House’s single malts.

The ownership of Inver House Distillers has changed following its acquisition by a succession of worldwide companies over the past ten years, its current owners being International Beverage Holdings Limited (International Beverage) which was established in 2005, to be the international arm of Thai Beverage Public Company Limited (ThaiBev), to facilitate the continued expansion of the drinks business outside of Thailand.

The 21 year old single malt scored a record-equalling 97.5 points out of 100 in test tastings. Quoted on the BBC Scotland News web-site, Murray stated: ‘The 21 year old Old Pulteney absolutely exploded from the glass with vitality, charisma and class.” He further hoped that “this award helps one of Scotland’s great unsung distilleries to become discovered around the world.’

Writing in his on-line blog, Old Pulteney distillery manager, Malcolm Waring wrote, ‘We received the news that we’d won on a Monday morning which, as you can imagine, made for a fantastic start to the week. Pulteney is just the second Scottish distillery to land the award and an amazing feat like this is testimony to the dedication and hard work that went into creating what we always knew was a very special product.

I can never speak highly enough of my team, and they fully deserve this recognition. The award has already given Old Pulteney a huge boost on the international market and closer to home we’ve been inundated with calls and visitors since the news broke. It’s a wonderful thing to be able to say that the best whisky In the world is made in Wick!’

On the distillery web-site they describe their 21 year old malt (46% ABV, non chill-filtered) as a marriage of ‘Old Pulteney matured in ex-bourbon wood with spirit from ex-sherry wood casks (mostly Fino sherries) made from American Oak. This adds yet another layer of complexity, depth and character to this truly superb malt whisky.’ The liquid is ‘golden amber with straw highlights.’ Its nose is described as ‘full bodied with traces of fruits (apples and pears); slightly fragrant with spicy overtones,’ and the taste ‘sweet to start with a light fruitiness; hints of honey and vanilla followed by a dry finish.’

The 12 year old malt
The 12 year old malt (40% ABV) is described on the distillery web-site as ‘the definitive expression in the Old Pulteney family.’ It is ‘traditionally crafted using techniques that other distillers have long abandoned’ and ‘matured wholly in air-dried, hand-selected ex-bourbon casks’ It has the colour of ‘deep amber with a slight pink hue.’ its nose is of ‘medium to high intensity, dry with a hint of sea air’ and its taste on the palate is described as ‘dry, medium bodied and smooth with a clean finish: faintly salty with a slight spicy note.’

Old Pulteney 12-years-old has won numerous gold medals at the most prestigious international competitions.

The Old Puleney 17 year old malt
The Old Pulteney 17 year old malt (46% ABV, non chill-filtered) according to their web-site ‘predominantly features ex-bourbon maturation, with the addition of spirit that has been wholly matured in Spanish wood ex-sherry casks, predominantly Pedro Ximenez and Oloroso.’ They further state that the subtle depth and complexity that is added to the maturing whisky makes their 17 year old ‘an outstanding after-dinner drink.’

Its taste is described as ‘full bodied, with hints of vanilla and floral notes in the background; a long-lasting memorable finish.’ and the colour is referred to as ‘red amber with a rich autumnal hue,’ with a nose that is ‘sweet with traces of apples and pears: slightly woody with a hint of butterscotch.’


The 30 year old malt
Old Pulteney also produce a 30 year old expression of its single malt (44% ABV), described as ‘matured in ex-bourbon (American oak) wood. It is neither coloured nor chill-filtered.’ Its colour is described as ‘a bright gold with a copper glow.’


As for its nose, ‘full and sweet with floral overtones, a complex mix of gooseberry, citrus and lemons. Woody with a hint of chocolate, ‘ and its taste, ‘full-bodied single malt with elements of honey and lemons. Oaky and aromatic with a warm spiciness and a sweet long-lasting finish.’


Liqueur Whisky
Finally, it is worth noting that Old Pulteney also produce a tasty liqueur whisky (28% ABV)


Old Pulteney 12 year old Single Malt Scotch Whisky is the basis for the liqueur, which has been carefully blended with a selection of natural Highland ingredients to create, according to the distillers ‘a truly memorable Scotch Whisky Liqueur with a beguiling aroma and a rich, fruity flavour.’


Old Pulteney is an environmental innovator
It is a little known fact that Old Pulteney is an environmental innovator. In conjunction with the North Highland Council, they use the excess thermal heat from the distillery as fuel to heat over 1500 local homes in Wick.


Old Pulteney Single Malt whisky has a long standing association with the sea and is also known as the “Maritime Malt”. It came as no surprise then to learn that Old Pulteney was the official partner of Jock Wishart’s Old Pulteney Row to the Pole Expedition, the goal of which he and his team achieved on the 26th August, 2011.


The Old Pulteney Row to the Pole Expedition saw Jock and five crew mates brave some of the harshest conditions on the planet as they rowed their specially-designed boat (named Old Pulteney) through Arctic waters to reach the 1996 Magnetic North Pole.??The expedition tested all the members to the limits of their endurance, and their incredible feat ranks alongside the first row across the Atlantic.??The challenge took place in July/August 2011 and was of global significance as both a pioneering maritime adventure and an environmental expedition.??The planned 450-mile route across the Arctic Sea started in Resolute Bay in Canada. Timing was of the essence as the final section of the journey was only navigable for a few weeks of the year before the waters refroze.


The final stages included an ice crossing that took almost 10 hours as the crew dragged the 1.3 ton boat, to ultimately arrive at the 1996 Magnetic North Pole at six thirty in the evening local time (0130 BST) on the 26th August 201


‘LAST CHANCE’ TO BUY OLD PULTENEY 21YO
16 July 2018
Fans of Highland single malt Old Pulteney are being offered the chance to buy the last available UK stocks of the Wick distillery’s discontinued 21 Year Old expression.

Old Pulteney 21 Year Old and 1989 Vintage
Going, going…: The twin pack offers the last UK stock of 21yo and the 1989 vintage
The single malt, named World Whisky of the Year in 2012 by Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible, is being offered for sale as part of a twin pack that also includes a bottle of Old Pulteney 1989 Vintage – named World’s Best Single Malt in the World Whiskies Awards 2016.

Priced at £600 each and available from mid-July, 276 twin packs are being made available exclusively in the UK, each one numbered and accompanied by a certificate signed by Pulteney distillery manager Malcolm Waring.

In June last year, Old Pulteney owner Inver House Distillers announced that it would discontinue the distillery’s 17-year-old and 21-year-old expressions thanks to a lack of available stock.

Two new expressions – a 25-year-old and a 1983 vintage – joined the Old Pulteney range in October last year.

‘The twin pack speaks for itself, with each expression winning a top, respected industry award for their exceptional quality,’ said Vicki Wright, Old Pulteney brand manager.

‘We are incredibly proud of these exquisite bottles and hope other passionate whisky drinkers share our enthusiasm about this special collector’s release.’


OLD PULTENEY UNVEILS ITS NEW CORE RANGE
August 2018
Old Pulteney is introducing three new single malts to replace the 17- and 21-year-olds discontinued earlier this year, as part of a ‘reinvigoration’ of its core range.

New Old Pulteney single malt whisky range 2018
Brand evolution: The four whiskies that form Old Pulteney’s new-look core range
The new core range will feature Old Pulteney’s existing 12-year-old, and the new no-age-statement Huddart, plus a 15- and 18-year-old.

Old Pulteney 25-year-old, which was once a part of the core range, has not been discontinued but will become a limited edition.

Stocks of the expression have been on allocation since it was named ‘World’s Best Whisky’ in Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible 2012.

The new Old Pulteney Huddart takes its name from the street on which Pulteney distillery is situated in Wick, Caithness. The street itself was named after Captain Joseph Huddart, a hydrographer who worked for the British Fisheries Society, which built Pulteneytown and its harbour.

The expression has been matured in a combination of second-fill American oak and ex-Bourbon casks, before being finished in ex-Bourbon casks that previously contained heavily peated whisky.

Described as having notes of mellow wood smoke, honey, oily leather and green apple, Huddart is bottled without an age statement at 46% abv and will be available for around £45.

Old Pulteney 15 Year Old is also bottled at 46% abv, having also been matured in second-fill American oak and ex-Bourbon casks. However the expression has been further matured in first-fill Spanish oak ex-oloroso Sherry butts, giving the whisky notes of Christmas cake, chocolate and ‘salty sea air’. It will be available for around £70.

Finally the new Old Pulteney 18 Year Old is matured in the same way as the 15-year-old, but has a ‘rich chocolate and creamy vanilla’ character. Bottled at 46% abv, it will be available for £115.

The Old Pulteney 12 Year Old will continue to be the entry-level malt for the distillery’s core range. Matured in predominantly refill American oak casks and bottled at 40% abv, the whisky continues to be available for £32.

The new-look Old Pulteney core range also sports a new bottle design, which ‘freshens up the overall look’ yet retains the brand’s distinctive bottle shape.

The new range will be available in the UK from August, before being rolled out to global markets throughout 2018-19.

The maritime malt removed its 17- and 21-year-old expressions in June 2017, citing stock shortages.

In July this year the distillery’s owner, Inver House Distillers, offered fans the ‘last chance’ to buy the last remaining stocks of the 21-year-old, as part of a twin pack that also includes a bottle of Old Pulteney 1989

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