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Isle of Arran

Whisky Collection Bar > J

ARRAN  

1 year old spirit  

61,5 %                       
1996
Cask Strenght
5 cl
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd,
Lochranza


ISLE OF ARRAN
3 years old
60.3 %
Cask Strenght
FIRST PRODUCTION
Limited Edition
One thousand bottles
Genummerde flessen
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

This bottle is one of a limited edition of one thousand of the first ever production of single malt whisky from Isle of Arran Distillery. A spirit must mature in wood for three years to be officially called whisky; this is one of the very first casks to be filled, laid down in the summer of 1995. Arran had a famous whisky-producing heritage up until the middle of the nineteenth century; and now this family-run company is once again pro¬ducing a malt whisky for connoisseurs. Made from the finest malt, the spring waters of Eason Biorach and our own specially commissioned stills, this is a bottle for whisky lo¬vers to cherish. The unique label is based on one from an Arran whisky from the turn of the century. This is the first ever bottling of the new Isle of Arran Single Island Malt truly history in the making

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
46 %
Non - Chillfiltered
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

The hidden secret of Arran lies far back in the mists of time. But now after 150 years the Arran whisky has been reborn at Lochranza, and with it the spirit and enterprise of the island. Now it is a secret no more.
The true spirit of nature.

ARRAN
geen leeftijd vermelding
43 %
Matured in Sherry Casks
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

A unique Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky. Arran captures the Character of this Beautiful Island of Clear Mountain water & soft Sea Air. In the Past, illicit stills Abounded on the Island, hidden in Remote Glens, & The Arran Malt was renowed as being one of the Fi¬nest in Scotland. Now The Arran Malt is reborn, using only Traditional Wooden washbacks, Copper Stills & Matured in Oak casks

ARRAN
4 years old
43 %
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
No. 1 1999/2000
SCOTTISH PAINTERS COLLECTION
Lochranza William Miller Frazer
3000 Genummerde flessen
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

The first of a series of seven is a beautiful vieuw of Lochranza, the home of the distillery, by the Perthshire painter William Miller Frazer.

ARRAN
geen leeftijd vermelding
40 %
Arran Single Island
Malt Scotch Whisky
ROBERT BURNS
WORLD FEDERATION
'A man's a man for a' that'
Limited Edition 2001
Genummerde flessen
Isle of Arran Distillers, Arran.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
60,1 %
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
FINISHED IN A COGNAC CASK
Single Cask Malt
Limited Edition
Bottled 14.10.03
482 numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers, Isle of Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, the whisky was filled into a fresh cognac cask until deemed ready for bottling.
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character.
Each bottle is individually signed as proof of authenticity.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
58,9%
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
FINISHED IN A RUM CASK
Single Cask Malt
Limited Edition
Bottled 23.9.04
287 numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers, Isle of Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into a fresh rum cask until deemed ready for bottling.
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character.
Each bottle is individually signed as proof of authenticity.

THE ARRAN MALT
8 years old
46 %
ARRAN FIRST
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Distilled 1995
Bottled 2004
Limited Edition
Non - Chillfiltered
2784 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers ltd, Arran
First Distillation - Limited Edition

The first distillation of an island distillery is an event of sungular importance. The casks which cradled this unique whisky were laid down in 1995, the year of the distillery's opening. For eight years they breathed in the invigorating airs of the west coast of Arran, while their contents slumbered to the murmers of the Kilbrannan sound.
The result has surpassed our expectations. Arran First is a limited edition bottling of 2,784 bottles.
Another landmark in the development of the Arran Malt.
Tasting notes:
Colour: Amber Gold
Nose: Orchard fruits, rich & spicy
Palate: Malty and sweet with a hint of hazelnut.

THE ARRAN MALT
8 years old
58,5 %
SINGLE CASK SCOTCH MALT WHISKY
Date distilled Nov 95
Date Bottled Jan 04
Society Cask code 121.4
Outturn 391 Bottles
The Scotch Malt Whisky Society,
The Vaults, Leith, Edinburgh
'An amazing body'

This compact, new build distillery is on an island that actually lies south of Edinburgh and Glasgow.
The distillery manager keeps a peacock and prize-winning ducks. This whisky is a winner too. It is honey gold from a refill hoggie. The nose has honey and mint, Crunchy bars and Ralgex.
With water it develops a hint of peach schnapps. The taste is of sweet butterscotch toffee neat, then mead-like with water. The mouth feel is warm and dry at the end but for a seven year old this really does have an amazingly full and vicious body.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
60.8 %
FINISHED IN A CALVADOS CASK
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Malt
Bottled 8.2.05
Numbered Bottles
Limited Edition
300 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into a fresh calvados cask until deemed ready for bottling.
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character. Each bottle is indivi¬dually signed as proof of authenticity.

ARRAN MALT
over 7 years old
46 %
THE McGIBBON's PROVENANCE
SPRING DISTILLATION
Special Single Malt Scotch Whisky Selection
Distilled at Arran Distillery
Arran Malt
Distilled - 1997 - Spring
Bottled - 2004 - Autumn
A Bottling from 3 Casks
D M G ref 1494/1495/1496
Matured in Sherry Hogshead
Un-Chillfiltered. No. Colouring
Douglas McGibbon & Co, Ltd, Glasgow

THE ARRAN MALT
7 years old
57.7 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Distilled 30.9.96
Bottled 20.4.04
Numbered Bottles
Limited Edition
221 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

From time to time, when inspecting casks in our warehouse our Malt Master, Gordon Mitchell discovers a cask which is maturing exceptionally well. His years of experience and skill enable him to determine which casks have developed the most individual and interesting character.

THE ARRAN MALT
6 years old
59.1 %
MATURED IN A SHERRY CASK
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Malt
Distilled 15.12.98
Cask no. 1522
Bottled 14.02.05
Limited Edition
Numbered Bottles
298 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

From time to time, when inspecting casks in our warehouse our Malt Master, Gordon Mitchell discovers a cask which is maturing exceptionally well. His years of experience and skill enable him to determine which casks have developed the most individual and interesting character.

It is only these single casks that are bottled as the Single Cask Malts. Each bottle is individually signed and numbered as proof of authenticity

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
62.0 %
FINISHED IN A BORDEAUX CASK
FROM ST. ESTEPHE
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Malt
Bottled 18.5.05
Numbered Bottles
312 Bottles
sle of Arran Distillers, Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into fresh port cask until deemed ready for bottling.
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character.
Each bottle is individually signed as proof of authenticity.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
57,7 %
FINISHED IN A PORT CASK
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Malt
Bottled 28-6-05
Limited Edition
Numbered Bottles
684 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into fresh port cask until deemed ready for bottling.
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character.
Each bottle is individually signed as proof of authenticity.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
56,9 %
FINISHED IN A MARSALA CASK
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Single Cask Malt
Limited Edition
304 Numbered Bottles
Bottled 22.10.04
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

THE ARRAN MALT
10 years old
55,3 %
THE WORLD'S PREMIER BOTTLING
OF THE ARRAN MALT 10 YEARS OLD
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Distilled: August 15 TH, 1995
Bottled September 9th - 11th 2005
Cask No. 10
At Cöpenicker Whisky Herbst 2005,
Berlin, Germany
360 Numbered Bottles
No Chill Filtration
Natural Colour
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd,  Arran
Wein & Whisky
Eisenacher Strasse 64,   
10823 Berlin – Schöneberg

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
59,9 %
LAST BOTTLE AND EMPTY
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
CHATEAU MARGAUX CASK FINISH
Bottled 4-8-05
330 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

Every year our Malt Master, Gordon Michèl-1 . chooses a selection of casks which have matured to a particularly high standard.
To develop the most interesting and individual characters, the whisky has subsequently been finished for a period using carefully selected casks from some of the world's finest wine and spirit producers.
The whisky in this bottle has been finished in a Premier Grand Cru Cask from Chateau Margaux which has added complexity to the subtle notes of Arran Malt

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
58,7 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
GRAND CRU CHAMPAGNE CASK FINISH
Bottled 18-8-05
317 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

Every year our Malt Master, Gordon Michèl-1 . chooses a selection of casks which have matured to a particularly high standard.
To develop the most interesting and individual characters, the whisky has subsequently been finished for a period using carefully selected casks from some of the world's finest wine and spirit producers.
The whisky in this bottle has been finished in a Grand Cru Cask from Champagne which has added complexity to the subtle notes of Arran Malt.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
59,9 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
CREAM SHERRY CASK FROM
GONZALES BYASS
Bottled 26-01-06
825 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in an Oloroso sherry cask, this whisky was filled into a fresh Gonzalez Byass cream sherry cask until deemed ready for bottling.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
56,7 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
MONTEPULCIANO D'ABRUZZO 'VILLA GEMMA'
CASK FROM THE HOUSE OF MASCISRELLI
Bottled 16-11-05
308 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into a carefully chosen Montepulciano d'Abruzzo 'Villa Gemma' cask from the cellars of Gianni Masciarelli, one of Italy's premier wine makers.

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
61,3 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
LEPANTO PX BRANDY CASK
FROM GONZALES BYASS
Bottled 13-01-06
759 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in a sherry cask, this whisky was filled into a fresh Lepanto P X Brandy Cask from Gonzalez Byass until deemed ready for bottling

THE ARRAN MALT
Aged 10 years
46 %
THE ISLAND MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Non Chill Filtered
Distilled, Matured and Bottled
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

A Unique Single Malt Scotch Whisky that captures the character of this beautiful island pf pure mountain water and soft sea air, washed by the Gulf Stream.
The use of unpeated malted barley in the production of the Arran 10 year Old has helped to create a beautifully rounded and well-balanced single malt. No artificial colouring has been added to this whisky thus ensuring a completely natural and traditional product.
The true spirit of nature

THE ARRAN MALT
geen leeftijd vermelding
56,6 %
SINGLE CASK MALT
Single Island Malt Scotch Whisky
Limited Edition
GONZALEZ BYASS
CREAM SHERRY FINISH
Bottled 26.1.06
825 Numbered Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

After maturing for many years in an Oloroso sherry cask, this whisky was filled into fresh Gonzalez Byass Cream sherry cask until deemed ready for bottling
This 'finishing' process accentuates the fruity apple notes that are a feature of all Arran Single Malts, resulting in a whisky with a truly unique character.
Each bottle is individually signed as proof of authenticity.

ARRAN
over 8 years old
43 %
ISLANDS SINGLE
MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
CONNOISSEURS CHOICE
Distillation Date: September 1998
Cask Type: Refill Sherry Hogshead
Bottling Date: May 2007
Proprietors: Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd
Gordon & Macphail, Elgin

Often referred to as ‘Scotland in Miniature’, the Isle of Arran at one time was home
to more than 50 whisky distilleries.
Founded in 1995, Arran Distillery is situated at Lochranza, the most northerly sited
of the island’s villages

THE ARRAN MALT
12 years old
46 %
THE ISLAND MALT
THE ICONS OF ARRAN DISTILLERY
NUMBER TWO
THE ROWAN TREE LIMITED EDITION
Distilled 1997
Bottled 2010
Limited Edition
6000 Bottles
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arranm

The Rowan Tree has a special place in Scottish folklore and is believed to ward of evil spirits.
Rowan Trees surrounding The Isle of Arran Distillery certainly play their part as only the purest spirit is produced here under the watchful eye of our distillery team

This 1997 distillation aged for 12 years, is classic Arran style and captures the flamboyant character of the Rowan tree
.
A glorious single malt with a rich and creamy aroma whilst  dark fruit notes  and a
warming  hint of ginger and allspice emerge with a dash of water. This second icon of Arran distillery has a peppery twistin the lingering finish and is a most complex and rewarding dram.

ARRAN
ANNIVERSARY BOTTLING
THE ARRAN MALT
54,6 %
CELEBRATING OUR 15th YEAR
Distilled in 1999
Bottled 2010
FINISHED IN AMONTILLADO
SHERRY CASKS
This Limited Edition of 5640 Bottles Marks
The 15th Anniversary of Isle of Arran Distillery
The true spirit of nature
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

August 2010
Arran Distillery lost up to 5000 Pounds a year in the early stages of the operation. This has narrowed over the years. In 2998 it made a loss of 137.000 Pounds and was 16.000 Pounds in 2009 by a turnover of 2.000.000 Pounds
The company is said to be on course of 40.000 profit this year.
Euan Mitchell, managing director is now seeking outside funds for the group which is
Currently privately owned by more than 100 local investors.

THE ARRAN MALT
ORKNEY BERE
46 %
VINTAGE 2 0 0 4
Aged over 8 year
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
AGRONOMY INSTITUT UNIVERSITY
OF THE HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS
ORKNEY COLLEGE
Bere is malted in Inverness
Distilled 2004
Matured in American Oak barrels
Bottled 2012 Non Chill Filtering No Colouring
Limited Edition 5800 Bottles
Distilled and Bottled in Scotland
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

Bere, Scotland’s oldest cultivated barley, was commonly used for the production of whisky
until the middle of the nineteenth century. Although bthis 6 – row barley is well – suited to
the short growing season of the north of Scotland, it is now only grown commercially on a
few Scottish islands, including Orkney, where Orkney’s Agronomy Institute is developing
new markets for the crop. Modern barleyvarietes long since eclipsed bere in the whisky
industry but, as this bottling testifies it can still produce a dramatic and distinctive single malt.

The Arran  Malt -  Orkney Bere

This single malt scotch whisky was produced as a collaboration between the Agronomy In –
stitute of Orkney College (University of the Highlands & Islands and isle of Arran Distillers.

The bere was grown on Orkney before being malted in Inverness and subsequently distilled
and matured on Arran.

It has been matured for over 8 years in American oak barrels and bottled at 46 % without
Chill – Filtration or the addition of artificial colouring. This is a taste of whisky as it used to be.

Tasting Notes:
Colour: Ripe golden barley
Aroma: Malty and herbal initially with hints of vanilla and freshly cut hay. A veritable
hedgerow of aromas are at play whilst honey and sweet fruits emerge with a dash of
water against a back – drop of rich toasted oak.
Palate:  Ripe apples and oak dominate at first before a full – bodied spiciness envelops
the palat.
Finish: The bold malt re – appears to mingle beautifully with the spices which soften over time. The influence of the bere barley is dramatic and unmistakeable; offering a taste
of whisky as it used to be.

Kleur: Witgoud
Neus: Vanille, fris, gedroogd fruit, havermout, papaya, vers hooi
Smaak: Pepertje, fudge, romig, tropisch fruit, peer, zoethout
Finish: Middellang. Gedroogd fruit en  havermout  mengt mooi  met een
vleug zoethout.  Intens prikkelende whisky waarin de invloed van deze
oergerst terugkomt met geuren en smaken van vers hooi en havermout

THE ARRAN MALT
Aged 16 years
46 %
Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Pure by Nature
Strictly Limited 9000 Bottles
Produced from un - peated barley
Matured in ex - Bourbon and
Ex - Sherry casks
Natural Colour
Non Chill - Filtered
Each Cask imparts its own unique
and distinct Mark upon the Spirit
it has matured over the years
Isle of arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

Colour: Golden Syrup
Aroma; Rich, lush honey with hints
of ginger and dark chocolate
Palate: Glides over the tongue in a
Toasted oak and lingering citrus
Notes of orange peel.  

THE ARRAN MALT
SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
53.4 %
Presents
THE DEVIL'S PUNCH BOWL
The Third in The Triology
Limited Edition
CHAPTER III NUMBER
THE FIENDISH FINALE
Natural strength
Without Chill Filtration
James MacTaggart, Master Distiller
Isle of Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran

THE DEVIL'S PUNCH BOWL

We present The Fiendish Finale to a Series of Dramatic Creations from our master Distiller.
A Masterpiece which brings this Unholy Trinity to a Triumphant Close.

"For Chapter III of the Devil's Punch Bowl I have chosen a broading selection of Arran's finest
aged Oloraso Sherry Butts which set the scene for the final performance.

Notes of distinctive dark chocolate and dried fruits give satisfying depth and provide the ideal
foundation for this last dram with the Devil.

The inclusion of French Oak Barriques adds a rich layer of spice and toasted oak to procee-
dings while the Bourbon Barrels bring the sweetness of honey and vanilla.

This final flourish of the Punch Bowl brings the curtain down in dramatic style"

James MacTaggart, Master Distiller

THE  FIENDISH  FINALE
The Devil’s  Punch Bowl Chapter III is a limited edition expression of The Arran Single Malt
inspired by the glacial hollow ‘Coire na Ciche’ whose sinister presence dominates the
north – east coast of Arran. Our fiendish Distiller James MacTaggart has persued the
darkest corners of our warehouses one last time to hand pick the finest casks for the third
and final release of this infernal trilogy of devilish drams. Casks across a range of ages
and types have been chosen to create perhaps the most distinctive Devils’s Punch Bowl
yet.

Bottled at natural strength and without chill – filtration, The Devil’s Punch Bowl is a tes-
timony to the consistent superior quality of The Arran Malt across each year of production.
Further details of every cask hand picked for this bottling can be found at www.arranwhisky.
com/stag.

Dare you be tempted by the Devil one final time

THE DEVIL’S  PUNCH  BOWL  CHAPTER  NO. 03
A faultless selection of Isle of Arran Distillers fiendishly good casks:

Sherry Butt: Cask No. 1648/1643/1827/1828/2105/219/220/ 714
French Oak Barrique: Cask No. 696/697/698/700/701/703/704/705
Bourbon Barrel: Cask No. 042/050/052/074/079

also see Lagg, now the now of Isle of Arran Distillery ihas changed
in Lochranza Distillery


The Western Islands
ARRAN  

Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran.
Harold Currie, eerder directeur bij Chivas Brothers en House of Campbell, begon in 1991 de bouw van de distilleerderij.
Op 29 Juni 1995 kwam om 2 uur 29 in de middag de eerste spirit uit de ketels.
Het was 160 jaar geleden dat er op Arran legaal whisky was gestookt.
De kleine distilleerderij heeft twee Forsyth ketels.
De whisky rijpt deels bij de distilleerderij en deels bij Springbank.
Om de distilleerderij en voorraden te financieren heeft men de 'Arran Bonds' bedacht; tegen betaling vooraf van E 450 krijgt de whiskyliefhebber een vat whisky waarvan hij in 1998 vijf dozen blended whisky en in 2001 vijf dozen single malt whisky ontvangt.
Naast Harold Currie zijn ook zijn zoons Paul en Andrew bij de distilleerderij betrokken.
De manager van Arran is Gordon Mitchell, afkomstig van de Cooley distilleerderij in Ierland.
Het water komt van Eason Biorach.


Arran Distillers Ltd, Arran.
Harold Currie, eerder directeur bij Chivas Brothers en House of Campbell, begon in 1991 de bouw van de distilleerderij.
Op 29 Juni 1995 kwam om 2 uur 29 in de middag de eerste spirit uit de ketels.
Het was 160 jaar geleden dat er op Arran legaal whisky was gestookt.
De kleine distilleerderij heeft twee Forsyth ketels.
De whisky rijpt deels bij de distilleerderij en deels bij Springbank.
Om de distilleerderij en voorraden te financieren heeft men de 'Arran Bonds' bedacht; tegen betaling vooraf van E 450 krijgt de whiskyliefhebber een vat whisky waarvan hij in 1998 vijf dozen blended whisky en in 2001 vijf dozen single malt whisky ontvangt.
Naast Harold Currie zijn ook zijn zoons Paul en Andrew bij de distilleerderij betrokken.
De manager van Arran is Gordon Mitchell, afkomstig van de Cooley distilleerderij in Ierland.
Het water komt van Eason Biorach.
Nu produceert men reeds de vatted malt Eileandour en de blends Glen Rosa, Island Prince en Loch Ranza.

August 2010
Arran Distillery lost up to 5000 Pounds a year in the early stages of the operation. This has narrowed over the years. In 2998 it made a loss of 137.000 Pounds and was 16.000 Pounds in 2009 by a turnover of 2.000.000 Pounds

The company is said to be on course of 40.000 profit this year.

Euan Mitchell, managing director is now seeking outside funds for the group which is
Currently privately owned by more than 100 local investors.

Isle of Arran Distillers has secured a 3.000.000 pounds cash injection from Clydesdale Bank
to build a warehouse on the island, to increase production

Bere
Pronounced 'bear' is a six - row barley and Britain's oldest cereal and currently cultivated
a very small scale by a few crofters on (mainly) Orkney (5 à 12 hectares, Islay ( for Bruich-
laddich Distillery), Shetland, South- and North Uist, Barra and Benbecula.

Bere, a very old grain that may have been brought to Britain in the 9th century by the Vikings,
or even from earlier settlements.

Bere, or in its early days also called "bygge", "big", "bear", or "beir" perhaps originating from
the old Norse term from "bygg"which is barley.

On Orkney the meal is called beremeal, but the crop is called corn.

Bere is a landrace adapted to grow on soils of a low P H and a very short growing season but
with long houirs of daylight as it is sown in spring and harvested in summer, and thus sown
late and harvested first, it is also known as "the 90 - day barley".

Bere was important in the 19th and 20th centuries in the Highland and Islands of Scotland.

Bere has a long history of use in making alcoholic beverages, Historical accounts from the
15th century onward show that Orkney produced a large amount of malt and beer, and a
ancient tradition of making bere - based home - brew survives until this day on Orkney.

Also the Campbeltown whisky distilleries and breweries used large quantities of bere from Orkney
during the 19th century.

But the advent of higher yielding barley varities led to a general decline of Bere.

It survives in cultivation thanks to Baron Mills, Birsay, also known as the Boardhouse Mill
on Orkney, a 18th century watermill, which purchases the Bere to produce beremeal
which is locally used in bread, biscuits, beremeal bannock and sold to produce beer and whisky.

At Baron Mills, a kiln for drying the bere is integral with the building, grinding is done in winter
and during the summer the Mill is open to tourists and the machinery is demonstated
by the miller, Rae Phillips (2012).

The Birsay Heritage Trust is the owner of Baron Mills

In the early 21st century some distillers began experimenting again with bere to produce
whisky and in 2006 the most northern brewery of Scotland released a bere - based microbrew.

The Agronomy Institute at Orkney College U H I has had a research program on Bere since
2002. The program is aimed at developing new markets for the crop and developing best
practices for growing it more easily and with increased yields

And now in 2012, Bruichladdich and Arran distilleries also produce whisky from bere.

Bere, Scotland's oldest cultivated barley, was commonly used for the production of whisky
until the middle of the nineteenth century. Although bthis 6 - row barley is well - suited to
the short growing season of the north of Scotland, it is now only grown commercially on a
few Scottish islands, including Orkney, where Orkney's Agronomy Institute is developing
new markets for the crop. Modern barleyvarietes long since eclipsed bere in the whisky
industry but, as this bottling testifies it can still produce a dramatic and distinctive single malt.

The Arran Malt - Orkney Bere
This single malt scotch whisky was produced as a collaboration between the Agronomy In -
stitute of Orkney College (University of the Highlands & Islands and isle of Arran Distillers.

The bere was grown on Orkney before being malted in Inverness and subsequently distilled
and matured on Arran.

It has been matured for over 8 years in American oak barrels and bottled at 46 % without
Chill - Filtration or the addition of artificial colouring. This is a taste of whisky as it used to be.

THE FIENDISH FINALE

The Devil's Punch Bowl Chapter III is a limited edition expression of The Arran Single Malt
inspired by the glacial hollow 'Coire na Ciche' whose sinister presence dominates the
north - east coast of Arran. Our fiendish Distiller James MacTaggart has persued the
darkest corners of our warehouses one last time to hand pick the finest casks for the third
and final release of this infernal trilogy of devilish drams. Casks across a range of ages
and types have been chosen to create perhaps the most distinctive Devils's Punch Bowl
yet.

Bottled at natural strength and without chill - filtration, The Devil's Punch Bowl is a tes-
timony to the consistent superior quality of The Arran Malt across each year of production.
Further details of every cask hand picked for this bottling can be found at www.arranwhisky.
com/stag.

Dare you be tempted by the Devil one final time.

THE DEVIL'S PUNCH BOWL CHAPTER NO. 03
A faultless selection of Isle of Arran Distillers fiendishly good casks:
Sherry Butt: Cask No. 1648/1643/1827/1828/2105/219/220/ 714
French Oak Barrique: Cask No. 696/697/698/700/701/703/704/705
Bourbon Barrel: Cask No. 042/050/052/074/079

Saturday  July 2015
Isle of Arran Distillers has reported record results despite a challenging year for the whisky industry.
The company said that turnover in the past year had risen by 21 per cent and net profit was up by 51 per cent - the best performance since the business began in 1995.
It said its success was being driven by brand sales, which were ahead by 25 per cent, in contrast to a slight decline for the Scotch whisky industry as a whole.
Export sales for Isle of Arran climbed, with key markets for growth including Canada, Germany and Taiwan. The firm's single malts are now available in 45 countries and it said further markets are "being explored".
After a succession of healthy profits reported over the last five years, turnover for the independent distiller has more than doubled since 2010.
Managing director Euan Mitchell said: "In a challenging period for Scotch whisky our continued growth is testament to a focus on quality and a clear strategy well executed.
"Some people believe when the big companies in the industry sneeze we all catch a cold but this is not our experience. Interest in smaller, independent brands such as ours is surging and we are not even scratching the surface in global terms."
As well as driving export sales, the Arran Malt range is set for increased distribution in the UK with Marks & Spencer, where two products will be available in stores later this year.
The distiller hailed the success of a repackaging of its core product range, which launched in the second half of 2014. Combined with a schedule of limited edition releases, particularly the final release of the Devil's Punch Bowl series, sales of Arran single malts were up by 23 per cent over the previous year.
Mitchell added: "We have invested to support the progress we expect to make. Two new pot stills are on order and will be installed in late 2016.
"This will allow production to double beyond one million litres of pure alcohol once fully commissioned.
"We have never been the kind of distillery to produce more than we expect to sell, so this boost in capacity and capability is purely a reflection of the anticipated demand for Arran malts."

The Isle of Arran Distillery has released the first of its limited edition Smugglers' Series whiskies, which celebrates the distillery's 21st birthday.
The Smugglers' Series is said to "honour the tradition" of the illicit whisky trade that operated from Arran and up the Clyde to Glasgow.
Euan Mitchell, managing direct of Isle of Arran Distillery said: "We're justifiably proud of the whisky-making heritage of the island. Visitors have long been fascinated in the illicit industry that ran between Arran and Glasgow in centuries past.
"With the distillery turning 21, it felt like the perfect time to commemorate that exciting time in Scotch whisky's heritage with a series that pays homage to its ancestors whilst looking forward to the distillery's future."
The series' packaging is designed to be "reminiscent of the hiding places used in the 18th and 19th centuries". Smugglers' Series Vol. 1, The Illicit Stills, is housed in a cut-out compartment of a would-be book.
The Illicit Stills has "a robust body and heavier peat influence, redolent of the whisky produced on the island in days gone by". It has been matured in bourbon barrels and port pipes and is non-chill filtered, with no artificial colouring.
Bottled at 56.4.% ABV, The Illicit Stills is limited to 8,700 bottles worldwide and is priced at £84.99.

Nu produceert men reeds de vatted malt Eileandour en de blends Glen Rosa, Island Prince en Loch Ranza.

August 2010
Arran Distillery lost up to 5000 Pounds a year in the early stages of the operation. This has narrowed over the years. In 2998 it made a loss of 137.000 Pounds and was 16.000 Pounds in 2009 by a turnover of 2.000.000 Pounds

The company is said to be on course of 40.000 profit this year.

Euan Mitchell, managing director is now seeking outside funds for the group which is
Currently privately owned by more than 100 local investors.

Isle of Arran Distillers has secured                                                                                                                                         

a 3.000.000 pounds cash injection                                                                                                                                             

from Clydesdale Bank
to build a warehouse on the island,                                                                                                                                                                          

to increase production


Bere
Pronounced 'bear' is  a six - row barley and Britain's oldest cereal and currently cultivated
a very small scale by a few crofters on (mainly) Orkney (5 à 12 hectares, Islay ( for Bruich-
laddich Distillery), Shetland, South- and North Uist, Barra and Benbecula.

Bere, a very old grain that may have been brought to Britain in the 9th century by the Vikings,
or even from earlier settlements.

Bere, or in its early days also called "bygge", "big", "bear", or "beir" perhaps originating from
the old Norse term from "bygg"which is barley.

On Orkney the meal is called beremeal, but the crop is called corn.

Bere is a landrace adapted to grow on soils of a low P H and a very short growing season but
with long houirs of daylight as it is sown in spring and harvested in summer, and thus sown
late and harvested first, it is also known as "the 90 - day barley".

Bere was important in the 19th and 20th centuries in the Highland and Islands of Scotland.

Bere has a long history of use in making alcoholic beverages, Historical accounts from the
15th century onward show that Orkney produced a large amount of malt and beer, and a
ancient tradition of making bere - based home - brew survives until this day on Orkney.

Also the Campbeltown whisky distilleries and breweries  used large quantities of bere from Orkney during the 19th century.

But the advent of higher yielding barley varities led to a general decline of Bere.

It survives in cultivation thanks to Baron Mills, Birsay, also known as the Boardhouse Mill
on Orkney, a 18th century watermill, which purchases the Bere to produce beremeal
which is locally used in bread, biscuits, beremeal bannock and sold to produce beer and whisky.

At Baron Mills, a kiln for drying the bere is integral with the building, grinding is done in winter and during the summer the Mill
is open to tourists and the machinery is demonstated
by the miller, Rae Phillips (2012).

The Birsay Heritage Trust is the owner of Baron Mills

In the early 21st century some distillers began experimenting again with bere to produce

whisky and in 2006 the most northern brewery of Scotland released a bere - based microbrew.

The Agronomy Institute at Orkney College U H I has had a research program on Bere since
2002. The program is aimed at developing new markets for the crop and developing best
practices for growing it more easily and with increased yields

And now in 2012, Bruichladdich and Arran distilleries also produce whisky from bere.

Bere, Scotland's oldest cultivated barley, was commonly used for the production of whisky
until the middle of the nineteenth century. Although bthis 6 - row barley is well - suited to
the short growing season of the north of Scotland, it is now only grown commercially on a
few Scottish islands, including Orkney, where Orkney's Agronomy Institute is developing
new markets for the crop. Modern barleyvarietes long since eclipsed bere in the whisky
industry but, as this bottling testifies it can still produce a dramatic and distinctive single malt.

Orkney Bere   
This single malt scotch whisky was produced as a collaboration between the Agronomy In -
stitute of Orkney College (University of the Highlands & Islands and isle of Arran Distillers.

The bere was grown on Orkney before being malted in Inverness and subsequently distilled
and matured on Arran.

It has been matured for over 8 years in American oak barrels and bottled at 46 % without
Chill - Filtration or the addition of artificial colouring. This is a taste of whisky as it used to be.

THE  FIENDISH  FINALE
The Devil's  Punch Bowl Chapter III is a limited edition expression of The Arran Single Malt
inspired by the glacial hollow 'Coire na Ciche' whose sinister presence dominates the
north - east coast of Arran. Our fiendish Distiller James MacTaggart has persued the
darkest corners of our warehouses one last time to hand pick the finest casks for the third
and final release of this infernal trilogy of devilish drams. Casks across a range of ages
and types have been chosen to create perhaps the most distinctive Devils's Punch Bowl
yet.

Bottled at natural strength and without chill - filtration, The Devil's Punch Bowl is a tes-
timony to the consistent superior quality of The Arran Malt across each year of production.
Further details of every cask hand picked for this bottling can be found at www.arranwhisky.
com/stag.

Dare you be tempted by the Devil one final time.
THE DEVIL'S  PUNCH  BOWL  
CHAPTER  NO. 03
A faultless selection of Isle of
Arran Distillers fiendishly good casks:
Sherry Butt: Cask No. 1648/1643/1827/
1828/2105/219/220/ 714
French Oak Barrique:
Cask No. 696/697/698/700/701/703/704/705
Bourbon Barrel:
Cask No. 042/050/052/074/079
Saturday July 2015
Isle of Arran Distillers has reported record results despite a challenging year for the whisky industry.
The company said that turnover in the past year had risen by 21 per cent and net profit was up by 51 per cent - the best performance since the business began in 1995.
It said its success was being driven by brand sales, which were ahead by 25 per cent, in contrast to a slight decline for the Scotch whisky industry as a whole.
Export sales for Isle of Arran climbed, with key markets for growth including Canada, Germany and Taiwan. The firm's single malts are now available in 45 countries and it said further markets are "being explored".
After a succession of healthy profits reported over the last five years, turnover for the independent distiller has more than doubled since 2010.
Managing director Euan Mitchell said: "In a challenging period for Scotch whisky our continued growth is testament to a focus on quality and a clear strategy well executed.
"Some people believe when the big companies in the industry sneeze we all catch a cold but this is not our experience. Interest in smaller, independent brands such as ours is surging and we are not even scratching the surface in global terms."
As well as driving export sales, the Arran Malt range is set for increased distribution in the UK with Marks & Spencer, where two products will be available in stores later this year.
The distiller hailed the success of a repackaging of its core product range, which launched in the second half of 2014. Combined with a schedule of limited edition releases, particularly the final release of the Devil's Punch Bowl series, sales of Arran single malts were up by 23 per cent over the previous year.
Mitchell added: "We have invested to support the progress we expect to make. Two new pot stills are on order and will be installed in late 2016.
"This will allow production to double beyond one million litres of pure alcohol once fully commissioned.
"We have never been the kind of distillery to produce more than we expect to sell, so this boost in capacity and capability is purely a reflection of the anticipated demand for Arran malts."

The Isle of Arran Distillery has released the first of its limited edition Smugglers' Series whiskies, which celebrates the distillery's 21st birthday.
The Smugglers' Series is said to "honour the tradition" of the illicit whisky trade that operated from Arran and up the Clyde to Glasgow.
Euan Mitchell, managing direct of Isle of Arran Distillery said: "We're justifiably proud of the whisky-making heritage of the island. Visitors have long been fascinated in the illicit industry that ran between Arran and Glasgow in centuries past.
"With the distillery turning 21, it felt like the perfect time to commemorate that exciting time in Scotch whisky's heritage with a series that pays homage to its ancestors whilst looking forward to the distillery's future."
The series' packaging is designed to be "reminiscent of the hiding places used in the 18th and 19th centuries". Smugglers' Series Vol. 1, The Illicit Stills, is housed in a cut-out compartment of a would-be book.
The Illicit Stills has "a robust body and heavier peat influence, redolent of the whisky produced on the island in days gone by". It has been matured in bourbon barrels and port pipes and is non-chill filtered, with no artificial colouring.
Bottled at 56.4.% ABV, The Illicit Stills is limited to 8,700 bottles worldwide and is priced at  £84.99.


Once buzzing with over 50 whisky distilleries, the island of Arran is currently home to just one, which claims its water, sourced from Loch Na Davie, is the purest in Scotland

As an island whisky, it might be thought that Arran would always have been peaty. Instead, it started life as a non-smoky ‘Highland-style' malt. Like any new build distillery, the equipment is in an easily managed single tier space with small semi-lauter mashtun, wooden washbacks and two pairs of small stills.

The character shows light cereal crunchiness behind a distinctly citric note. Arran has also shown that this distillate, allied to a quality-focused wood policy, has given single malt that is capable of extended ageing. These days, peated malt is also being run.

Also produced here:
Robert Burns

Although the Arran distillery is relatively new (production started in 1995), the island in the Firth of Clyde has a long history of whisky-making. A fertile place, the farmers in the south of the island had plenty of raw materials to work with, and when home distillation and small stills were effectively banned in the late 18th century, they simply went underground.

After all, demand for smuggled whisky was on the rise and Arran had excellent links to Glasgow. There is some evidence that molasses was also distilled here. When the law changed a legal distillery ran at Lagg from 1825, but it closed in 1837 and Arran’s distilling heritage was seemingly lost forever.

All that changed in 1995 when a consortium, headed by former Chivas Bros MD Harold Currie, chose a site at Lochranza in the north of the island. The decision to move to a part of Arran that was previously unknown for whisky was a result of two facts: a good water supply and potential for tourism. Today, in excess of 60,000 people visit the distillery every year.

Further cash was made by selling casks of whisky to private individuals but the scheme was halted when it was discovered that though the money raised was useful in creating initial cashflow, it resulted in the distillery not owning a significant percentage of its own stock – a problem when trying to build a brand.

Bottling started with a limited edition three-year-old in 1998 and the range has continued to expand, although today there are fewer ‘finished’ variants than in the past. A peated expression ‘Machrie Moor’ has also been introduced.

In 2017 an expansion of the distillery was completed with the installation of an additional wash and spirit still, more than doubling Arran’s capacity to 1.2m litres per year. To accommodate the growing number of visitors to the distillery, Arran added a second tasting room to its visitor centre, and built an adjacent facility with meeting room, tasting bar and blending room named Rowan House.

CAPACITY (MLPA) i
1.2
CONDENSER TYPE i
Shell and tube
FERMENTATION TIME i
65hrs
FILLING STRENGTH i
68.5%
GRIST WEIGHT (T) i
2.5
HEAT SOURCE i
Indirect steam through a bank of thin,
stainless steam plates
MALT SPECIFICATION i
Unpeated (46 weeks per year), 20ppm
(four weeks per year) or 50ppm (2 weeks per year)
MALT SUPPLIER i
Boortmalt, Glenesk Maltings
MASH TUN TYPE i
Semi Lauter
NEW-MAKE STRENGTH i
68.5%
SINGLE MALT PERCENTAGE i
95%
SPIRIT STILL CHARGE (L) i
4,800
SPIRIT STILL SHAPE i
Bulb shape with a long narrow lyne arm
STILLS i
4
WAREHOUSING i
Dunnage, racked and palletised
WASH STILL CHARGE (L) i
6,500
WASH STILL SHAPE i
Broad pot with a tall narrow neck and long narrow lyne arm
WASHBACK CHARGE (L) i
13,000
WASHBACK SIZE (L) i
15,000
WASHBACK TYPE i
Wood
WASHBACKS i
5
WATER SOURCE i
Gleann Easan Biorach
WORT CLARITY i
Clear
YEAST TYPE i
Kerry 'M' strain

Isle of Arran Distillers
1995

ARRAN REVEALS NEW LOOK AND TWO NEW MALTS
September 2019
Arran distillery has created a ‘new identity’ for its single malt range with updated packaging and the launch of two new single malts.

Arran malt 10-year-old, Barrel Reserve, the Bothy and the Bodega whiskies
New look: Arran's revamped core range, including its new Barrel Reserve and Bodega whiskies
Arran’s ‘fresh’ new look follows the recent opening of Isle of Arran Distillers’ second distillery at Lagg, on the south of the island.

James MacTaggart, distillery manager at Arran, which is situated at Lochranza on the north coast, said: ‘With the opening of our second distillery at Lagg it felt like the right time to make the clear distinction between the unique and very different spirits produced at each of our island homes.

‘We’ve taken inspiration from the elements that make Lochranza so special to produce a unique and beautiful new pack, which does justice to the liquid it contains.’

The new labels and outer packaging, designed by London agency Stranger & Stranger, incorporate an icon in the shape of Arran, a pair of the island’s native eagles and ripples to reflect the island’s mountain waterfalls.

The packaging will be applied to Arran’s entire core range, including two new additions.

Arran Single Malt Barrel Reserve is a new, no-age-statement whisky matured in American oak casks, bottled at 43% abv and said to be full of ‘citrus and light vanilla sweetness’ on the palate.

The second expression, named Bodega, is also a no-age-statement malt matured in ex-Sherry hogsheads.

Said to contain notes of ‘dark chocolate, spice, ripe figs and sweet cherries’, the whisky is bottled at a cask strength of 55.8% abv.

Both expressions will be available from 16 September on the Arran Whisky website, shipping to the UK and international markets excluding the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Two more single malts – an 18- and a 21-year-old expression – will be added to the core range in October.

The four new whiskies will join the distillery’s 10-year-old flagship single malt, and its quarter cask-matured Bothy expression.
FEATURES
WHISKY MAKERS REDISCOVER BERE BARLEY
Bere barley has been grown in Scotland for at least 1,000 years, and probably much longer. Now this ancient crop is being revived – and whisky is playing its part.  .

The exposed fields of Orkney are hardly ideal arable farming country. Bleak and windswept, with an all-too-brief growing season, it’s little surprise that conventional barley varieties struggle to ripen here. Better to keep a few cattle, or sheep.
And yet barley is grown in Orkney; barley of a particular type. It’s a distinctive, tall, six-row crop with an annoying tendency to ‘lodge’ – the flattening effect seen when the stems bend over to the ground. But at least you can get it ripe.
This is bere barley, and it’s been in Orkney for at least a millennium, and probably for much longer. ‘Bere is probably the oldest cultivated barley, definitely in Britain and probably one of the oldest still in cultivation in Europe,’ says Peter Martin, director of the Agronomy Institute at Orkney College, part of the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI).

The name ‘bere’ – pronounced ‘bear’ – is close to the Anglo-Saxon for barley, and it is also sometimes referred to as ‘bigg/bygg/bygge’, from the Old Norse word for the crop.

‘Exactly how old is it? We don’t know,’ admits Martin. ‘It’s definitely been grown here for 1,000 years, but there may be evidence further back in the archaeological record. Barley has been grown in Orkney as far back as 4,000BC and the introduction of agriculture.’
In contrast to modern, scientifically bred barley varieties, bere is a ‘landrace’, meaning it has gradually evolved and adapted to local growing conditions as successive generations of farmers choose the seeds from the best plants for the following year’s crop, in a kind of human-assisted process of natural selection.
Distinctive character: Bere barley is a six-row, rather than two-row, barley variety
So bere grows rapidly during the long summer days of northern latitudes, ripening three weeks before modern varieties, despite being planted as late as May. This minimises the risk of crop failure caused by poor weather at either end of the growing season. Bere also tolerates a wide variety of poor-quality soils, from acidic and peat-rich to sandy and alkaline.
And yet, 20 years ago, it was all but extinct, rendered apparently obsolete by higher-yielding modern malting varieties such as Concerto and Odyssey. By the start of the 21st century, there was as little as 10 hectares of bere grown in Scotland, by a handful of farmers on Orkney, Shetland and in the Western Isles.
Revival came, initially, through baking. Barony Mill, a 19th-century Orkney watermill, began using beremeal (flour) to make bannocks, biscuits and bread. From 2002, the UHI started researching bere’s characteristics and end uses – including brewing and distillation.
But making whisky with bere barley is nothing new. It was used extensively in the past; for example, during the boom years of Campbeltown, as ‘gauger’ or exciseman Joseph Pacy discovered when he was posted there in 1834:
‘The peat-dried malt from which this whiskey was produced was made from grain designated in Scotland “Bere or Bigg”, a small kind of barley grown on the light sandy soil of that country. The tax on that description of malt was something like one-fifth less than that on malt made from [modern] barley, a kind of boon or protection to the grower of this lighter kind of grain.’
(The Reminiscences of a Gauger, Imperial Taxation, Past and Present Compared, pp.66-67)
Bere experts: Peter Martin (right) and John Wishart of the UHI have conducted extensive research
As demand soared and supplies ran short on Kintyre, distillers tried to pass off conventional barley from Ireland as bere in order to reap the tax benefits. Pacy investigated, the culprits were fined and forfeited their malt – and the gauger became deeply unpopular with the locals as a result.
Orkney distillery Highland Park’s barley books record purchases of bere back to the 1880s, and as late as the early 1920s – but there the whisky trail for bere goes cold for more than half a century.
When bere whisky resurfaces, it is as a curiosity: a one-off independent bottling by the late Michel Couvreur of bere barley grown on Westray, floor-malted at Highland Park and distilled at Edradour in 1986, which was released in the mid-1990s.
In 2004, Isle of Arran Distillers collaborated with the UHI on a whisky made with Orkney bere, bottling the result at eight and 10 years, while Springbank has worked with Kintyre-grown bere periodically, including a 2013 distillate scheduled for release in 2028 to mark the Campbeltown distillery’s bicentenary.
The biggest champion of bere whisky today, however, is Bruichladdich. Following the Islay’s distillery’s revival in 2001, bere’s status as an outlier barley variety ticking the boxes of heritage, provenance and terroir was hugely appealing. Bere was planted on Islay in 2005, but it never took; the project was abandoned in 2009, with the last years’ failed crops used for animal feed.
Since then, the distillery has sourced its bere, through Martin and the UHI, from a handful of Orkney farmers, resulting in a succession of releases, including most recently the Bruichladdich Bere Barley 2010 single malt launched in August.
Tall and heavy: As a ‘landrace’, bere barley has evolved to adapt to local growing conditions
But it hasn’t been easy. ‘It broke the mash tun the first time we worked with it,’ says Bruichladdich communications manager Christy McFarlane. ‘The husk is so hard. We’ve had to reduce the tonnage. And it gets stuck in the mill.’
It was a similar story on Arran, says Isle of Arran Distillers MD Euan Mitchell: ‘I do recall our distillery manager at the time, Gordon Mitchell, saying the bere malt was tricky to work with and clogged up the mash tun. His actual words were a bit coarser than that…’
Another drawn to the romance of bere was Alasdair Day, co-founder of Isle of Raasay distillery owner R&B Distillers. ‘The whole story resonated with me when we turned up on Raasay,’ he recalls. ‘I said: “We want to grow barley here.” The local crofter just fell off his chair laughing and said we couldn’t do that because it wouldn’t ripen.’
Day was vindicated – sort of. Bere was planted on Raasay in 2017, the year the distillery opened, and it did ripen. ‘It’s really hard to describe, but it just felt at home – like it was meant to grow there. It was really tall, with long straw and, as a six-row barley, really top-heavy.’
However, the crop went unharvested, thanks to a lack of the right infrastructure and machinery, and not helped by bere’s tendency to ‘lodge’ or flatten when battered by the Raasay elements.
‘It’s something I would go back to,’ says Day. ‘The holy grail is flavour, but as a young distillery you have to be aware of yield as well. If we had the infrastructure, I would certainly persevere.’
Bannock time: Barony Mill in Birsay, Orkney, was a pioneer of bere’s recent revival
Bere is expensive, both financially and in terms of lost spirit yield. The Arran bere malt was roughly twice the price of regular malt in the mid-2000s, and the spirit yield was 15% lower. That broadly reflects the experience at Bruichladdich – production director Allan Logan reckons bere’s tonnage per acre is about half that of conventional two-row barley.
‘The yield is also much less,’ adds McFarlane, ‘but we don’t really care, because it’s all about flavour.’
What flavour?
‘Full-on flavour. I’m quite certain that, in a blind taste test, people would be able to tell the difference, even after time in cask. There is this very unctuous, sweet, well-rounded quality to bere barley.’
Mitchell agrees. ‘The yield was quite low, but the resultant whisky was superb, particularly the cask strength version at 10 years old. Full of oils and a rich, gristy-malty flavour. It’s definitely a case of quirky flavours over high-yielding profitability.’
There are plans for Arran’s new Lagg distillery to work with bere in the future – Mitchell says it was the barley type used at the historic Lagg distillery – while Bruichladdich is continuing its commitment to bere, and to the Orkney farmers who grow it.
Bere has also returned to Islay, part of Bruichladdich’s extensive barley trials currently under way at Shore House Croft. So far, the signs have been far from encouraging, but it’s a long-term project.
Bere whisky: Bruichladdich is willing to pay more and sacrifice yield for the sake of flavour
But there’s much more to bere barley than whisky; more to it even than the bere beers brewed on Orkney, or Barony Mill’s bannocks and bread. Researchers are particularly interested in bere’s genetic diversity, which could help to future-proof cereal farming against issues related to climate change and food security.
‘There are some beres that seem to have a remarkable tolerance to growing on sandy soils with a deficiency of trace elements such as manganese, copper and zinc,’ explains Martin. ‘Beres on the Western Isles, but also in Orkney and Shetland, are able to grow on sandy soils without any additional applications of these trace elements. The modern variety just doesn’t grow – or it will grow, but not yield grain.’
In time, it is hoped that these unique traits could be bred into modern barley varieties, creating new bere hybrids with the ability to grow and ripen in a far wider variety of locations. Such a development, Martin says, could have global significance.
For whisky, the work of the International Barley Hub – due to open at the James Hutton Institute in Invergowrie in 2022 – will be pivotal. Even now, says Day, there are early signs of hybridisation occurring where bere is growing alongside modern malting barley variety Concerto. ‘The trick, I suppose,’ he adds, ‘will be to get bere’s earliness with shorter straw and better yields.’
If that can be accomplished, without sacrificing the distinctive flavour and texture that make bere so attractive to whisky makers, then we could soon see its plantings expand out of Orkney to Raasay, Islay and beyond; and the future of this historic – maybe prehistoric – barley will be brighter than ever.

2019
The Arran core range is revamped, new bottles
Capacity: 1.200.000 Ltrs
Output: 450.000 Ltrs

1993
Harold Currie founds the distillery
1995
Production starts on 17th August
1998
First release a 3 years old
2002
SC 1995 is released
2003
SC 1997, non chill filtered and a
Calvados Finish is released
2004
A Cocnac Finish, a Marsala Finish, a Port
Finish, and The Arran First 1995 are released
2005
A Arran 1996, a Margaux, a Champagne Finish
are released
An unofficional 10 years old is launched
2006
An officional 10 years old is released and
some new Wood Finishes
2007
Gordon' s Dam is released and Four new
Wood Finishes
2008
A 12 year old is released and four new
Wood Finishes
2009
Peated SC, two Wood Finishes released
2010
A 14 year old Rowan Tree, tree cask finishes,
and Machie Moor peated are released
2011
The Westie, Sleeping Warrior, and a 12 year
CS released
2012
The Eagle, The Devil's Punch Bowl are
released
2013
A 16 year old, a new edition of Machrie
Moor are released
2014
A 17 year old, a Machrie Moor CS are
released
2015
A 18 year old and The Ilicit Stills are
released
2017
The Exiseman is released
2018
A 21 year old and Brodick Bay are
released
2019
Rhe Core range is revamped and
the Lochranza Castle Limited Edition
are rleased
Capacity:1.200.000 Ltrs
Outpu: 450.000 Ltrs = 150.000  less
than last year before and is due to
the fact that 250.000 Ltrs of the peated
new make will instead made by the new
Lagg distillery instead of the Arran
distillery
2020
Since Arran Distillers has two distilleries
on the Island, the name of Arran distillery
is now changed in Lochranza
A 25 years old and a 21 year old Kildonan
& Pladda are released




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