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Edrington Group

Whisky Concerns

THE  EDRINGTON  GROUP  LIMITED

Edrington is a Scottish company and is controlled 100 % by The Robertson Trust.

The Trust bears the family name of the three Robertson sisters who inherited the many Scotch Whisky interests founded and developed by their father and grandfather.

Keen to ensure the un-going success of these interests, in 1961 they brought them together under The Edrington Group (named after a farm near their home) and established The Robertson Trust

This charitable trust is funded to a considerable degree by divided income from The Group and is charged with supporting a wide variety of charitable causes, largely in Scotland.

Last year (2009) the Trust gave 8,4 million Pound to charities.

The Brands:

The Famous Grouse, Cutty Sark, The Macallan, Highland Park, Brugal

Other Brands: The Glenrothes, The Glenturret and Tamdhu

THE  EDRINGTON  GROUP  LIMITED



1855    William A. Robertson starts business in Glasgow

1857   Robertson & Baxter are founded

1879   Clyde Bonding Company Ltd founded

1884     Clyde Coperage Company Ltd is founded

1885     The North British Distillery Company Ltd founded,
                                  a patent - still distillery, shareholders include wine and
                                  spirit merchants and blenders such as Andrew Usher,
                                  William Sanderson & Son, James Watson & Co, John
                                  Crabbie & Co and George Robertson from Robertson &
                                  Baxter  

1887   Highland Distilleries Limited is formed, an amalgamation
between Bunnahabhain on Islay and Glen Rothes in Speyside, one of the promoters was W.A. Robertson from
Robertson & Baxter

1920    J.P.O. Brien Ltd sells Caol Ila to Robertson & Baxter

1922   Buchanan - Dewar, John Walker & Sons and The Distillers
Company Limited. (D.C.L. now Diageo) purchased for over
1000.000 Pound the stocks of Robertson & Baxter owners
of Haig & Haig with its brand Pinch, so named in the United States and outside the U.S. named Dimple

Robertson & Baxter were obliged to sell because the company's minority shareholders wished to realize their
                investments
      
                Robertson & Baxter was reconstructed to concentrate on
                blending for the own - label licensed trade

1927   Caol Ila distillery is sold to The Distillers Company Limited, (D.C.L. and now Diageo)

1936   Robertson & Baxter supplies Cutty Sark for Berry Bros and
Rudd Limited in London

1961   Edrington Holdings Ltd established

1965   Robertson & Baxter aquires Lang Brothers Ltd and their      
Glengoyne distillery

1967      Clyde Cooperage becomes part of The Group

1970   Highland Distilleries Ltd acquired Matthew Gloag & Son
blenders of the famous Grouse and Black Bottle

1993   Robertson & Baxter acquires a 50 % interest in North
British Distillery

1996   Robertson & Baxter, Clyde Bonding Company, The Clyde
Coopergae Company are restructured and renamed The Group

1997   Cutty Sark International, a joint venture is formed with
Berry Bros & Rudd Limited

1998   There are conflicts between The Edrington Group and High-
land Distillers about future strategy about the management
of Macallan and Famous Grouse and the question or wether
Highland Distillers should be reprivatised.

1999   The Edrington Group Limited together with William Grant
and Sons Limited (Glenfiddich) buy Highland Distillers Ltd,
The Edrington Group already owns a 28 % share in Highland Distillers.
The 1887 Company, since this time its official name, belongs for 30 % to the Grants and 70 % to The Edrington
Group

2001     Group's head quarters moves from West Nile Street to
Great Western Road in Glasgow

2002      Edrington signs agreement with Hite Group to supply Lan-
          celot range in South Korea

2008   Edrington acquires majority in Brugal Company in the
Dominican Republic, a rum company

2008   Edrington sells Glenglassaugh distillery

2009   Edrington and Beam Global set up a sales and distribution alliance in 24 international growth markets


EDRINGTON  GROUP

February 2010


Edrington Group buys Cutty Sark from Berry Bros & Rudd.

In the deal is included that Berry Bros & Rudd will acquire the single malt brand Glenrothes
from the Edrington Group, which has signed long - term supply agreements to provide
whisky fillings to Berry Bros & Rudd

Edrington Group retains ownership of the distillery of Glenrothes

Edrington was since about 70 years the suppliers of blended whisky for the brand Cutty Sark

The transaction will involve Edrington Group acquiring distribution contracts on Cutty Sark
and its distribution alliance, Maxxium will continue to distribute The Glenrothes single malt
whisky.

Is is expected to provide a distribution option for other brands within Berry Bros & Rudd's
super - premium spirits range of spirits.

The agreement starts at April 2010

Ian Curie of Edrington Group: "In an ever - consolidating drinks industrie, this deal offers
significant operational synergies and market advantages. It improves our distribution in
key territories and strengthens our position as an independent premium grand company"

Berry Bros & Rudd's Hugh Sturges said" The acquisition reflected its ambition to grow its
super - premium business as the Glenrothes single malt whisky is one of the world's
fastest growing single malts and we are convinced that future growth will come from us
focusing even more on our strengths. This means targeting our sales and marketing efforts
on those brands and sectors where we can compete most effectively and develop market
positions that will drive real value on the long term.

EDRINGTON  GROUP      November 2009


Capacity:

Glenrothes                         5.600.000 litres                                                                     
Glenturret                             340.000 litres
Highland Park                   2.500.000 litres
Macallan                           8.000.000 litres
Tamdhu                             4.000.000 litres

Edrington Group

        September 2010


        Edrington Group is investing 10.000.000 Pound in a new whisky processing facility
        and high - speed bottling line at its main Glasgow site.

        The investment has been committed following a review of its whisky supply and
        manufacturing needs end will mean 23 job losses.

       The company which employs 450 men at the Great Western Road site, is consulting
       with those likely to be effected by the proposals.

       The restructuring follows a move by Edrington to improve its operational efficency
       and cut costs. The firm says it will create industry - leading manufacturing facilitys
       to meet the needs of the business.

       Edrington has invested more than 37.000.000 Pound in the last five years.

       The company is controlled by The Roberston Charitable  Trust

       Chief executive is Ian Curie.

28 June 2011

The Edrington Group have sold Tamdhu distillery to Ian Macleod Distillers

Ian Curie, Chief Executive of The Edrington Group said: We are delighted
to  complete the sale of Tamdhu to Ian Macleod Distillers. The Edrington Group
and Ian Macleod Distillers Distillery have a good relationship back for many years, and we know the Tamdhu Distillery and brand will be in good hands.

From Edrington's perspective, the sale will further de - complex our business, allowing us to continue to focus on the growth of our 5 key brands: The Famous
Grouse, The Macallan, Brugal, Cutty Sark and Highland Park.


Edrington has its headquarters in Glasgow and owns four Scottish distilleries, namely Glenrothes, Glenturret, Highland Park and Macallan, as well as being co-owner with Diageo of Edinburgh’s North British grain distillery. The organisation also has a majority shareholding in Brugal & Co, the leading producer of golden rum in the Dominican Republic, allowing for diversification beyond the sphere of Scotch whisky.

Glenturret in Perthshire is home of The Famous Grouse Experience, one of Scotland’s leading whisky-based attractions, while visitors are also welcome at Highland Park in the Orkney Islands and Macallan. The latter distillery on Speyside is the subject of a major reconstruction programme lasting until 2017, which includes the build of a new £100 million distillery. The Macallan is the third-best-selling single malt in the world, and has set many auction records with its rarest bottlings.

Robertson & Baxter was established in Glasgow during 1855 as a whisky and wine merchant and later whisky blender. Members of the Robertson family were also involved in the creation in 1887 of the Highland Distilleries Co, which initially owned Bunnahabhain distillery on Islay and Glenrothes on Speyside, and for many years Robertson & Baxter acted as sole selling agents for Highland Distilleries.

The Edrington name came into existence when the three Robertson sisters, Agnes, Elspeth and Ethel, inherited the whisky businesses founded and developed by their grandfather and father. In 1961 they formed the Edrington Group – named after a farm near their Scottish Borders home – which is owned by the Robertson Trust, a charitable institution.

In 1937 Highland Distilleries bought Highland Park, going on to acquire the Perth company of Matthew Gloag & Son in 1970. The prize Gloag asset for Highland Distilleries was The Famous Grouse blend, established in the late 19th century, though the Gloags had been acting as wine and spirit merchants in Perth since 1800.

In 1996 Highland Distilleries acquired a majority interest in Macallan, and three years later Edrington and William Grant & Sons bought Highland Distilleries for £601 million, with Suntory and Rémy Cointreau already shareholders. The 1887 company was formed to operate the assets, with Edrington holding 70% of the shares.

Brugal & Co was purchased in 2008, and two years later Edrington acquired the Cutty Sark brand from Berry Bros & Rudd, with whom it has enjoyed a long trading relationship. In return Edrington transferred the Glenrothes single malt brand to Berry Bros & Rudd, though the distillery remained in Edrington’s ownership.

Edrington eventually reacquired the Glenrothes brand in 2017 to aid efforts to accelerate its growth in international markets.

DISTILLERIES & BRANDS

Cutty Sark
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Glamis
HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Glen Crinan
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Glen Fyne
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Glen Graeme
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Glenfyne
HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Glenrothes
SPEYSIDE SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Glenturret
HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Gloag's
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Highland Park
ISLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Jon, Mark & Robbo's
BLENDED MALT SCOTCH WHISKY


Macallan
SPEYSIDE SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Parkmore
SPEYSIDE SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Perth Royal
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Peter Greig
BLENDED MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Red Hackle
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Scottish Cream
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
The Famous Grouse
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

Hepburn & Ross
Highland Distillers
Jon, Mark & Robbo's Easy Drinking Whisky Company
Lothian Distillers Company
Matthew Gloag & Son
Robertson & Baxter Group
Row & Company
The Glenfyne Distillery Company

ROBERTSON & BAXTER GROUP

Part of the Robertson family’s extensive holdings in the Scotch whisky industry, Robertson & Baxter was a wholesale whisky blender with close ties to Highland Distillers and the Clyde Bonding Co. Both of these companies were either partially or wholly owned by the family and gave Robertson & Baxter access to large amounts of whisky, warehousing and bottling facilities. Three of founder William Robertson’s descendants were responsible for ensuring the on-going independence of the company, and creating the only whisky business to be wholly owned by a charitable trust.

Robertson & Thompson was founded by Fife-born William Alexander Robertson as a wholesale whisky blender and agent in Glasgow in 1855. When co-founder Robert Thompson left to open his own business in 1860 John Baxter – a clerk within the company – became partner. And so, Robertson & Baxter was formed. When Baxter retired in 1872, Northumbrian Thomas Wightman stepped in to take his place, but Baxter’s legacy continued in the company name.

As the R&B business grew, the partners looked into the possibility of building a distillery on Islay and in 1881 – in partnership with William Ford & Sons and McMurchy & Ralston – they founded the Islay Distilling Co. Ltd. to build Bunnahabhain distillery. A shortage of barrels led to the founding of the Clyde Cooperage Co. Ltd. in 1884 to support the needs of the company and its distillery.

The company became part of a group that founded Highland Distillers in 1887, following the merger of the Islay Distilling Co. with the Glenrothes distillery. William Robertson served as first chairman of the new business and R&B was appointed sole agent for Highland Distillers whiskies.

In 1892 R&B purchased the Glenglassaugh distillery near Portsoy for £10,000 and promptly re-sold it to Highland Distillers for £15,000. Four years later R&B – along with 14 other partners including William Grant – built the Tamdhu distillery in Speyside. The following year founder William Robertson died leaving a trust fund in his will for his 10 children, which was to run until his youngest daughter turned 21. His oldest son, James, became chairman of the company.

The early part of the 20th century saw a string of new acquisitions and investments for the group, including the purchase of Haig & Haig in 1907, and later Glenfyne distillery in Argyll, and Strathdee near Aberdeen. In 1919 R&B provided the majority share capital to form West Highland Malt Distillers Ltd., with the aim of sharing costs and preventing the closure of six Campbeltown distilleries: Glen Nevis, (Glen) Scotia, Glengyle, Dalintober, Kinloch, Ardlussa. However, it wasn’t long before WHMD was liquidated in 1924, Scotia being the only distillery to survive the company’s bankruptcy.

By 1922 the children of the company’s partners who were not working in the industry wished to release the assets tied up in R&B. As such, Haig & Haig was passed to DCL and all the whisky stocks sold equally to a consortium consisting of DCL, John Walker & Sons and the newly merged Buchanan-Dewar group before the company was placed in voluntary liquidation. Two sons, James and Alexander, formed a new company, Robertson & Co., with the aim of purchasing the remaining assets and the original company name. Unfortunately, so complex was the liquidation that this took over 10 years to complete and it was 1937 before all the assets were transferred. At this point, James Robertson’s three daughters received 3,000 shares each in the new company.

During this period R&B had agreed a contract with wine and spirits merchant Berry Bros. & Rudd in London to blend and supply BBR’s Cutty Sark blended Scotch whisky – a brand that would grow to become one of the first million-case spirits in the US. From this point onwards, R&B focused its efforts on supplying and bottling whisky blends under contract to trade suppliers.

To reinforce the relationship between R&B and Highland Distillers, Alexander Robertson’s death in the 1940s gave Highland Distillers the opportunity to purchase his shareholding. This locked the two companies together and helped them both withstand future takeover attempts.

The company purchased whisky blender Hepburn & Ross in 1959, including its popular Red Hackle brand, and in 1965 it also acquired Lang Brothers Ltd. including the Glengoyne distillery.

In 1961, the three daughters of James Robertson, who wished to preserve the independence of the group, placed all of the family interests into one holding company, which they called Edrington. The sisters – Miss Agnes, Miss Ethel and Miss Elspeth – requested the dividends from Edrington be passed to a new charitable trust, The Robertson Trust, which is now one of Scotland’s largest having donated more than £150 million to Scottish charities.

Already a major shareholder in Edinburgh grain distillery North British, R&B collaborated with Grand Metropolitan in 1993 to purchase the business. The two companies created Lothian Distillers as a joint venture to oversee the operation of the distillery.

Eventually, in 1996, Edrington began a major restructuring of its businesses and brought R&B, along with Clyde Bonding Co. and the Clyde Cooperage Company under the Edrington Group name. Highland Distillers followed shortly after.

ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

The Edrington Group (Current owner)
Hepburn & Ross
Highland Distillers
Jon, Mark & Robbo's Easy Drinking Whisky Company
Lothian Distillers Company
Matthew Gloag & Son
Row & Company
The Glenfyne Distillery Company

THE FAMOUS GROUSE

Over the last century or so The Famous Grouse has developed into one of the world’s leading Scotch whiskies and in recent years has been flanked by complementary expressions to form a range of its own.

The Famous Grouse range also features Smoky Black, which incorporates peated whiskies from Islay and also Glenturret distillery into the blend, as well as a heavily-peated expression, Black Grouse Alpha Edition, which features a higher content of aged malts.

The Naked Grouse was introduced as a premium offering in the range, containing whiskies matured in first-fill Sherry casks for a richer, fruiter flavour. The Famous Grouse Mellow Gold, designed to impart a ‘smoother’ and sweeter palate, is the newest addition to the range.


While many sources claim the Famous Grouse story began in 1800, the story of Matthew Gloag & Sons didn’t start with the Gloags at all. Rather, it began with the Browns.

John Brown established his Perth grocery business in 1800 before moving the premises to Atholl Street seven years later. It was his daughter, Margaret, who married Matthew Gloag. She took over the family business from her father in 1824 and ran it until Matthew took control a little over a decade later.

It was in fact Margaret who acquired a license to sell wine and spirits (and snuff) in 1831; Matthew didn’t join the business until 1835 when the name was changed to Matthew Gloag. Margaret died just five years later.

Business in Atholl Street was good; Gloag had a wide knowledge of wines and spirits after managing the cellar of the Sheriff Clerk of Perthshire for more than 30 years. By the time Queen Victoria and Prince Albert visited Scotland for the first time in 1842 as guests of the Earl of Mansfield, he was given the honour of supplying food and wine to the Earl’s home at Scone Palace near Perth. After the Queen and Prince’s visit, enthusiasm south of the border soon spread for all things Scottish; a market trend that he was keen to exploit.

By the time Matthew Gloag died in 1860, the family business portfolio focused mostly on wines and his son, William Gloag, largely continued this trend.

It wasn’t until Matthew Gloag III inherited the business from William in 1896 that the company registered its first blended Scotch, the Brig o’ Perth. A year later, The Famous Grouse was released at the same time as The Grouse Brand.

Originally, The Famous Grouse was priced lower than the Grouse Brand. In a little over 10 years, the reverse would be true thanks to the popularity of The Famous Grouse. As if to emphasise the family connection, it was Matthew III’s daughter, Phillippa, who drew the very first, and now famous, red grouse that we see on the bottle.

When US Prohibition came into force in January 1920, the Scotch world was dismayed. Economic depression, coupled with high taxation, had forced a high reliance on export markets. However, as was the case with a handful of other blenders, the company’s distribution to markets close to the United States such as Canada, Latin America and the West Indies suddenly shot up. If some shipments made their way into the States, then so be it.

By the 1960s, business had grown to such an extent that exports to America alone had risen to 12 million proof gallons. By 1968 it had risen to 33m. The future was looking rosy for Matthew Gloag & Sons, but just two years later tragedy struck. Both Matthew Frederick Gloag – Matthew Gloag III’s grandson and a major shareholder in the company – and his wife, Edith, passed away within two days of each other.

In the same year Estate Duty was running at 30% on all properties worth over £10,000. These costs, coupled with the death duties due on both his parents, forced Matthew Irving Gloag and his partners to seek a buyer for the company. Just months later Highland Distillers bought the company for £1.25m, although Matthew Irving Gloag remained as a director to continue the family’s involvement.

Highland Distillers’ ownership lasted until November 1999 when The Edrington Group purchased it for £601m. Edrington remains the owner of The Famous Grouse and the Glenturret distillery; which is now home to the visitor attraction, The Famous Grouse Experience.

Since Edrington’s takeover, the process of premiumisation has been on-going at The Famous Grouse. In 2006, the peated Black Grouse was released, followed two years later by Snow Grouse, a blended grain whisky. By 2010, The Naked Grouse was introduced as a premium offering.

In July 2015, while still retaining the traditional Famous Grouse bottling, the company rebranded The Black Grouse as The Famous Grouse Smoky Black, and introduced The Famous Grouse Mellow Gold to create the brand’s first core range.

At the same time a distinctly purple-hued redesign of The Famous Grouse’s packaging was implemented in a bid to premiumise the brand.

TIMELINE

1800
Joseph Brown opens a grocery shop in Perth
1807
Brown moves the shop to 22 Atholl Street; this becomes the headquarters for The Famous Grouse for 99 years
1817
Margaret Brown, Joseph’s daughter, marries Matthew Gloag
1824
Margaret takes over her father’s business
1835
Matthew Gloag joins his wife full-time at the Atholl Street shop
1842
Matthew Gloag wins the contract to supply food and wine for the visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert to Perth
1896
William Gloag dies; his nephew, Matthew Gloag III, takes over the business. The Gloags register their first blended Scotch: the Brig o’ Perth
1897
Both The Grouse Brand and The Famous Grouse are launched
1905
The Famous Grouse brand is officially registered to Matthew Gloag and Sons Ltd.
1970
Matthew Frederick Gloag and his wife, Edith, pass away; Highland Distillers buys The Famous Grouse for £1.25m
1984
The Famous Grouse is awarded a Royal Warrant by Queen Elizabeth II
1990
Highland Distillers is taken over by The Edrington Group for £601m
2002
Matthew Irving Gloag retires from the company due to ill health. The last Gloag to be involved in the company, he remains a consultant for life
2006
The Black Grouse is launched
2015
The Famous Grouse’s core range is overhauled and redesigned; Mellow Gold is introduced
OWNERS

The Edrington Group logo
PARENT COMPANY

The Edrington Group
1999 - present
CURRENT OWNER

Matthew Gloag & Son
PREVIOUS OWNERS

Highland Distillers
1970 - 1999
Matthew Gloag & Son
1896 - 1970

THE FAMOUS GROUSE

Over the last century or so The Famous Grouse has developed into one of the world’s leading Scotch whiskies and in recent years has been flanked by complementary expressions to form a range of its own.

The Famous Grouse range also features Smoky Black, which incorporates peated whiskies from Islay and also Glenturret distillery into the blend, as well as a heavily-peated expression, Black Grouse Alpha Edition, which features a higher content of aged malts.

The Naked Grouse was introduced as a premium offering in the range, containing whiskies matured in first-fill Sherry casks for a richer, fruiter flavour. The Famous Grouse Mellow Gold, designed to impart a ‘smoother’ and sweeter palate, is the newest addition to the range.


While many sources claim the Famous Grouse story began in 1800, the story of Matthew Gloag & Sons didn’t start with the Gloags at all. Rather, it began with the Browns.

John Brown established his Perth grocery business in 1800 before moving the premises to Atholl Street seven years later. It was his daughter, Margaret, who married Matthew Gloag. She took over the family business from her father in 1824 and ran it until Matthew took control a little over a decade later.

It was in fact Margaret who acquired a license to sell wine and spirits (and snuff) in 1831; Matthew didn’t join the business until 1835 when the name was changed to Matthew Gloag. Margaret died just five years later.

Business in Atholl Street was good; Gloag had a wide knowledge of wines and spirits after managing the cellar of the Sheriff Clerk of Perthshire for more than 30 years. By the time Queen Victoria and Prince Albert visited Scotland for the first time in 1842 as guests of the Earl of Mansfield, he was given the honour of supplying food and wine to the Earl’s home at Scone Palace near Perth. After the Queen and Prince’s visit, enthusiasm south of the border soon spread for all things Scottish; a market trend that he was keen to exploit.

By the time Matthew Gloag died in 1860, the family business portfolio focused mostly on wines and his son, William Gloag, largely continued this trend.

It wasn’t until Matthew Gloag III inherited the business from William in 1896 that the company registered its first blended Scotch, the Brig o’ Perth. A year later, The Famous Grouse was released at the same time as The Grouse Brand.

Originally, The Famous Grouse was priced lower than the Grouse Brand. In a little over 10 years, the reverse would be true thanks to the popularity of The Famous Grouse. As if to emphasise the family connection, it was Matthew III’s daughter, Phillippa, who drew the very first, and now famous, red grouse that we see on the bottle.

When US Prohibition came into force in January 1920, the Scotch world was dismayed. Economic depression, coupled with high taxation, had forced a high reliance on export markets. However, as was the case with a handful of other blenders, the company’s distribution to markets close to the United States such as Canada, Latin America and the West Indies suddenly shot up. If some shipments made their way into the States, then so be it.

By the 1960s, business had grown to such an extent that exports to America alone had risen to 12 million proof gallons. By 1968 it had risen to 33m. The future was looking rosy for Matthew Gloag & Sons, but just two years later tragedy struck. Both Matthew Frederick Gloag – Matthew Gloag III’s grandson and a major shareholder in the company – and his wife, Edith, passed away within two days of each other.

In the same year Estate Duty was running at 30% on all properties worth over £10,000. These costs, coupled with the death duties due on both his parents, forced Matthew Irving Gloag and his partners to seek a buyer for the company. Just months later Highland Distillers bought the company for £1.25m, although Matthew Irving Gloag remained as a director to continue the family’s involvement.

Highland Distillers’ ownership lasted until November 1999 when The Edrington Group purchased it for £601m. Edrington remains the owner of The Famous Grouse and the Glenturret distillery; which is now home to the visitor attraction, The Famous Grouse Experience.

Since Edrington’s takeover, the process of premiumisation has been on-going at The Famous Grouse. In 2006, the peated Black Grouse was released, followed two years later by Snow Grouse, a blended grain whisky. By 2010, The Naked Grouse was introduced as a premium offering.

In July 2015, while still retaining the traditional Famous Grouse bottling, the company rebranded The Black Grouse as The Famous Grouse Smoky Black, and introduced The Famous Grouse Mellow Gold to create the brand’s first core range.

At the same time a distinctly purple-hued redesign of The Famous Grouse’s packaging was implemented in a bid to premiumise the brand.


1800
Joseph Brown opens a grocery shop in Perth
1807
Brown moves the shop to 22 Atholl Street; this becomes the headquarters for The Famous Grouse for 99 years
1817
Margaret Brown, Joseph’s daughter, marries Matthew Gloag
1824
Margaret takes over her father’s business
1835
Matthew Gloag joins his wife full-time at the Atholl Street shop
1842
Matthew Gloag wins the contract to supply food and wine for the visit of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert to Perth
1896
William Gloag dies; his nephew, Matthew Gloag III, takes over the business. The Gloags register their first blended Scotch: the Brig o’ Perth
1897
Both The Grouse Brand and The Famous Grouse are launched
1905
The Famous Grouse brand is officially registered to Matthew Gloag and Sons Ltd.
1970
Matthew Frederick Gloag and his wife, Edith, pass away; Highland Distillers buys The Famous Grouse for £1.25m
1984
The Famous Grouse is awarded a Royal Warrant by Queen Elizabeth II
1990
Highland Distillers is taken over by The Edrington Group for £601m
2002
Matthew Irving Gloag retires from the company due to ill health. The last Gloag to be involved in the company, he remains a consultant for life
2006
The Black Grouse is launched
2015
The Famous Grouse’s core range is overhauled and redesigned; Mellow Gold is introduced
OWNERS

The Edrington Group logo
PARENT COMPANY

The Edrington Group
1999 - present
CURRENT OWNER

Matthew Gloag & Son
PREVIOUS OWNERS

Highland Distillers
1970 - 1999
Matthew Gloag & Son
1896 - 1970

HIGHLAND DISTILLERS

Perhaps it was the discerning acquisitions of its board, or the close relationship the company held in whisky blender and agent Robertson & Baxter that led to Highland Distillers’ success. During its time Highland Distillers bought and operated several Scotch distilleries and brands, including Highland Park, Tamdhu, Bunnahabhain, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Glenglassaugh, Macallan, and the Black Bottle and The Famous Grouse blends.

It became part of The Edrington Group in 1999, which was established by the descendants of one of Robertson & Baxter’s founders.

For the best part of its operation, Highland Distillers was focused squarely on the purchase and operation of distilleries to supply the blended whisky brands owned by its close trade partner Robertson & Baxter.

It was established in 1887 with the amalgamation of the Islay Distillery Company – the owner of the newly built Bunnahabhain distillery – and Glenrothes distillery. Robertson & Baxter, the Glasgow whisky merchant and blender, was involved in its set-up, and was the sole selling agent for Highland Distilleries for many years. It even assisted in the purchase of distilleries for the group – in 1892 R&B bought Glenglassaugh near Portsoy and promptly flipped it to Highland Distillers, with a £5,000 mark-up of course.

In 1897 a group of blenders that included William Grant – who was a director of Highland Distillers at the time – built Tamdhu distillery at Knockando, and sold it onto Highland Distillers two years later.

The 20th century brought Highland Distillers ample opportunities to acquire new distilleries, though it was choosy about its purchases. In 1937 it purchased Highland Park on Orkney, though just a year earlier it declined an offer to buy The Glenlivet from George & JG Smith.

Come 1948, following the death of Alexander Robertson, Highland Distillers finally acquired its own shares in Robertson & Baxter, which incestuously maintained its own shares in the former. The two companies worked almost hand-in-hand – Highland Distillers’ malts were used extensively in R&B’s blends, and the companies even had offices in the same building.

The company’s first foray into blended whisky came in 1970 with the acquisition of Matthew Gloag & Son, the Perth whisky merchant and owner of The Famous Grouse blend following the untimely death of Freddie Gloag. It didn’t acquire Glenturret distillery, now the home of The Famous Grouse in Scotland, for another 20 years.

In the years that followed, Highland Distillers added the disused Parkmore distillery buildings, the Black Bottle blend and Macallan distillery to its portfolio.

By 1999 it had grown to become one of the largest distillery operators and blenders in the country. That year Highland Distillers joined The Edrington Group, which had been established in 1961 by the three daughters of James Robertson using the family’s company interests.

Edrington formed the 1887 Company to manage the assets joining its portfolio, which included Highland Park, Tamdhu, Bunnahabhain, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Glenglassaugh, Macallan, Parkmore, and the Black Bottle and Famous Grouse brands. Many have since been sold on, and only Highland Park, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Macallan, Parkmore and Famous Grouse remain with Edrington to this day.

ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

The Edrington Group (Parent company)
The 1887 Company (Owner)
Hepburn & Ross
Jon, Mark & Robbo's Easy Drinking Whisky Company
Lothian Distillers Company
Matthew Gloag & Son
Robertson & Baxter Group
Row & Company
The Glenfyne Distillery Company

Perhaps it was the discerning acquisitions of its board, or the close relationship the company held in whisky blender and agent Robertson & Baxter that led to Highland Distillers’ success. During its time Highland Distillers bought and operated several Scotch distilleries and brands, including Highland Park, Tamdhu, Bunnahabhain, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Glenglassaugh, Macallan, and the Black Bottle and The Famous Grouse blends.

It became part of The Edrington Group in 1999, which was established by the descendants of one of Robertson & Baxter’s founders.

HIGHLAND DISTILLERS

For the best part of its operation, Highland Distillers was focused squarely on the purchase and operation of distilleries to supply the blended whisky brands owned by its close trade partner Robertson & Baxter.

It was established in 1887 with the amalgamation of the Islay Distillery Company – the owner of the newly built Bunnahabhain distillery – and Glenrothes distillery. Robertson & Baxter, the Glasgow whisky merchant and blender, was involved in its set-up, and was the sole selling agent for Highland Distilleries for many years. It even assisted in the purchase of distilleries for the group – in 1892 R&B bought Glenglassaugh near Portsoy and promptly flipped it to Highland Distillers, with a £5,000 mark-up of course.

In 1897 a group of blenders that included William Grant – who was a director of Highland Distillers at the time – built Tamdhu distillery at Knockando, and sold it onto Highland Distillers two years later.

The 20th century brought Highland Distillers ample opportunities to acquire new distilleries, though it was choosy about its purchases. In 1937 it purchased Highland Park on Orkney, though just a year earlier it declined an offer to buy The Glenlivet from George & JG Smith.

Come 1948, following the death of Alexander Robertson, Highland Distillers finally acquired its own shares in Robertson & Baxter, which incestuously maintained its own shares in the former. The two companies worked almost hand-in-hand – Highland Distillers’ malts were used extensively in R&B’s blends, and the companies even had offices in the same building.

The company’s first foray into blended whisky came in 1970 with the acquisition of Matthew Gloag & Son, the Perth whisky merchant and owner of The Famous Grouse blend following the untimely death of Freddie Gloag. It didn’t acquire Glenturret distillery, now the home of The Famous Grouse in Scotland, for another 20 years.

In the years that followed, Highland Distillers added the disused Parkmore distillery buildings, the Black Bottle blend and Macallan distillery to its portfolio.

By 1999 it had grown to become one of the largest distillery operators and blenders in the country. That year Highland Distillers joined The Edrington Group, which had been established in 1961 by the three daughters of James Robertson using the family’s company interests.

Edrington formed the 1887 Company to manage the assets joining its portfolio, which included Highland Park, Tamdhu, Bunnahabhain, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Glenglassaugh, Macallan, Parkmore, and the Black Bottle and Famous Grouse brands. Many have since been sold on, and only Highland Park, Glenturret, Glenrothes, Macallan, Parkmore and Famous Grouse remain with Edrington to this day.

ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

The Edrington Group (Parent company)
The 1887 Company (Owner)
Hepburn & Ross
Jon, Mark & Robbo's Easy Drinking Whisky Company
Lothian Distillers Company
Matthew Gloag & Son
Robertson & Baxter Group
Row & Company
The Glenfyne Distillery Company

THE GLENFYNE DISTILLERY COMPANY

Robertson & Baxter created this wholly owned subsidiary company in 1919 to purchase and operate the Glenfyne distillery in Ardrishaig, on the banks of the Crinan Canal. The distillery closed in 1919 but the company still sits on the books of Edrington.

After William Foulds & Co. of Greenock was declared bankrupt in 1918, Robertson & Baxter Ltd. had its eye on securing its assets for itself. The following year The Glenfyne Distillery Company was created to purchase the Glenfyne distillery (also known as Glendarroch) in Ardrishaig, and the Scottish Cream blend.

Glenfyne distillery was located in a picturesque part of Scotland at the southern end of the Crinan Canal, and was easily viewed by passengers travelling by boat. Alfred Barnard visited the distillery when it was known as Glendarroch, and noted how impressed he was by the ‘enchanting’ location and slick operation of the site.

Its single malt was known as Glamis, though Glenfyne Distillery Co also blended and bottled the Peter Greig, Glen Fyne and Glen Crinan whiskies.

The Glenfyne Distillery Co. continued to operate the distillery until 1937 when it was closed, however the distillery warehouses continued to be used for a number of years. Most of the buildings have now been demolished and the company sits silently as part of Edrington.

DISTILLERIES & BRANDS

Glamis
HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Glen Fyne
BLENDED SCOTCH WHISKY
Glenfyne
HIGHLAND SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
Peter Greig
BLENDED MALT SCOTCH WHISKY
ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

The Edrington Group (Current owner)
Hepburn & Ross
Highland Distillers
Jon, Mark & Robbo's Easy Drinking Whisky Company
Lothian Distillers Company
Matthew Gloag & Son
Robertson & Baxter Group
Row & Company

Pernod sells the Glenallachie Distillery
13 July, 2017

Pernod Ricard has announced the signing of an agreement with the Glenallachie Consortium, comprising Billy Walker, Graham Stevenson and Trisha Savage, for the sale of the Scottish distillery Glenallachie.

The transaction also includes the Glenallachie single malt brand, MacNair’s and White Heather blended scotch brands, and relevant inventories to support future development of those brands.

Pernod says the disposal is in line with its strategy to focus on its priority spirits and wine brands and to adjust its industrial footprint to its needs.

The closing of the transaction is subject to customary conditions and is expected to take place before the end of 2017.

The Glenallachie Consortium
Billy Walker is a well known character in the scotch whisky industry, having now been involved in the industry for more than 40 years. With a degree in chemistry Walker has been involved in most aspects of the production of scotch whisky, having spent time at Ballantines, Inver House Distillers and Burn Stewart. More recently he was instrumental in establishing and building the BenRiach Distillery Company prior to its sale in 2016.

Graham Stevenson is a chartered accountant who has spent almost 30 years in the scotch whisky industry. He initially joined the North British Distillery Company in Edinburgh before moving to Inver House Distillers in 1994. He has remained there for the past 23 years, most of that time as managing director.

Trisha Savage has over 30 years’ experience in scotch. Starting at Burn Stewart she has worked with Billy throughout her career and was also instrumental in establishing and building the BenRiach Distillery Company.

The consortium says its mission is to be a wholly Scottish-owned, Scottish-based, and truly independent scotch whisky company producing excellent whiskies and offering them to the market at premium but affordable prices.
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